Hulu Adds Yu-Gi-Oh! The Movie: Pyramid of Light, The Dark Side of Dimensions

November 16, 2018 at 12:00 pm | Posted in 4Kids, English dubbed, Pyramid of Light, The Dark Side of Dimensions, Yu-Gi-Oh! | Leave a comment
Tags: ,

Yu-Gi-Oh! The Movie: Pyramid of Light and The Dark Side of Dimensions movie posters from Hulu

Yu-Gi-Oh! movie double feature time? Yu-Gi-Oh! movie double feature time. Hulu is now streaming both Yu-Gi-Oh! The Movie: Pyramid of Light and Yu-Gi-Oh! The Dark Side of Dimensions! If you missed seeing Pyramid of Light in theaters earlier this year, you’ll definitely want to catch it here because it’s the newly remastered version with a stunningly clean widescreen picture.

If you are looking to make it a triple feature, Yu-Gi-Oh! Bonds Beyond Time is streaming for free on CONtv and Tubi TV.

Yu-Gi-Oh! Animators Shuji Maruyama, Junichi Hayama at Youmacon 2018

November 9, 2018 at 11:00 pm | Posted in 5D's, Duel Monsters, Japanese, The Dark Side of Dimensions, Yu-Gi-Oh!, ZEXAL | 2 Comments
Tags: ,

Shuji Maruyama and Junichi Hayama at Youmacon 2018 opening ceremonies
Shuji Maruyama (left) and Junichi Hayama

Fans of anime, manga, and Japanese culture descended upon Detroit, Michigan, last weekend for the annual Youmacon convention. This event would be a very special one for animation fans because the convention welcomed four animators straight from Japan, including two highly respected and beloved Yu-Gi-Oh! animators.

Making his first ever appearance in the United States was Shuji Maruyama, a very prolific Yu-Gi-Oh! animator and animation director who has worked on Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters, 5D’s, ZEXAL, ARC-V, Bonds Beyond Time, and The Dark Side of Dimensions. Maruyama is probably best known by fans as the character designer for 5D’s. More recently, he has worked on Fuuka, Recovery of an MMO Junkie, and Hanebado!.

Returning for his second appearance at Youmacon was Junichi Hayama, who has served as an animator and animation director for Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters and as a key animator for The Dark Side of Dimensions. Hayama is well known for his mastery of the brush pen and has most recently been working on Golden Kamuy.

Joining Maruyama and Hayama were two more talented animators: Mamoru Yokota, who has worked on Death Note, Naruto, and Gatchaman Crowds; and Shigefumi Shingaki, who works full time at Toei Animation as an animation director for One Piece.

Over the weekend, all four animators participated in live drawing events, where cameras were homed in on their paper and pencils to get an up-close view of their artistic process, and in Q&A panels where they tackled burning questions from the audience.

But there was one very special panel that was not to be missed by any Yu-Gi-Oh! fan: “Draw of the Cards.” Moderated by Anthony “Kroze” Kresky of Yu-Gi-Oh! Abridged fame, Draw of the Cards was dedicated entirely to all things Yu-Gi-Oh!, with Shuji Maruyama and Junichi Hayama offering insights about the Yu-Gi-Oh! series they’ve worked on and delighting the audience with their illustrations.

This post contains a full transcript of the Draw of the Cards panel and also highlights the Yu-Gi-Oh! artwork that Maruyama and Hayama presented at Youmacon 2018.

Transcript: Draw of the Cards, a discussion about Yu-Gi-Oh!

Kroze: I’d like to start this panel by talking about what goes into animating and drawing a show that’s highly based on just people playing cards against each other. How do you make that exciting from an animator aspect?

Hayama: That’s something that the author of the source material really thinks of so I really don’t have any say in that.

Maruyama: This is a work with an actual proper source material so I make sure a lot of the elements from the source material are not lost in the adaptation.

Kroze: Since it’s coming from manga source material that already exists, has there ever been any difficulty adapting something over into the animated show that was easier to tell over in the manga?

Maruyama: I want to really keep the elements from the source material intact so I make sure to use the same “image.” So I really want to make sure I preserve the touches, the styles, the expressions, and the angles that are from the manga and convert that into an animation style.

Hayama: Exactly what Maruyama said. Adapting from manga to animation — they seem very similar but they’re actually very different in a lot of components. In manga, most of the time a lot of the motion and feelings are all condensed into one single image. Whereas in animation, you have to keep in mind that it is in motion and you really want to have fluidity in the entire content. At the same time, knowing how to make sure that the essence of the source material is intact while converting that to a fluid motion is what separates amateurs from veterans.

Kroze: Do you ever look to the cards for art inspiration when adapting some of the sequences into animation?

Hayama: We don’t actually take inspiration directly from the cards. There are dedicated people that deal with the monster designs so that they can be adapted from the cards to the animation. [Takahiro] Kagami is one good example of them. He is known among the fan community as one of the best animation directors in the production team.

Maruyama: Kagami did a lot of the earlier monster designs as well as the God Cards’ monster designs.

Kroze: Yu-Gi-Oh! has had a lot of great characters over the many years. Is there any character that you take pleasure in animating and drawing?

Hayama: I don’t have a particular favorite character because I make sure that plot lines and story lines are intact, and so I see value in all the characters.

Interpreter: Is that genuinely your answer? Or are you saying that because you don’t want to answer the question?

Hayama: No, seriously! Every single one has an important role in the story line.

Maruyama: Just from the ease of drawing, I really like to draw Yusei because I draw a lot of him, so I’ve got a lot of practice for him. But my particular favorite is Bruno from 5D’s. I like his role in the story and his design.

Kroze: Because Yusei is simple for you to draw, does it make the action scenes a lot easier to create? Does it let you be more dynamic because you don’t have to concentrate that much on Yusei?

Maruyama: Hmm…

Hayama: The more you draw, the easier it gets. You have the image of the picture revealed in your mind, so there’s one less thing to deal with. So sometimes even the smallest details like how his fingers appear, the more you draw, the more you memorize how they actually look. So in other words, practice makes perfect. At some point, it becomes a habit as opposed to a task.

Kroze: All of the Yu-Gi-Oh! shows have so many action sequences in them. Are there any particular ones that stand out that you had a lot of fun animating?

Hayama: I don’t remember. Sorry.

Maruyama: It’s not an action scene, but one of my favorite scenes is in Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters when Yugi is dueling Joey while he was being controlled by Marik. I love that, especially the scene where, after the duel is over, Yugi jumps into the water to try to help Joey. That’s one of my favorite scenes because it really allows me to reidentify, to reassure that their friendship just goes above and beyond what friendship really, truly is.

Kroze: At this point, I’d like to take a couple of questions from the audience.

Audience member: You’ve talked about which characters you look forward to drawing. Which characters are the most difficult to draw?

Hayama: Actually, monsters were really hard to draw. In Duel Monsters, there’s that black magician wearing some sort of belts fighting against Pegasus.

[Audience members shout out the name — Magician of Black Chaos.]

Hayama: When I saw that character design, I was like, you’ve got to be freakin’ kidding me.

[The audience laughs.]

Maruyama: A lot of the dragons in 5D’s were really hard to draw because a lot of them were 3D designs, even though some of them, like Black Rose, were drawn most of the time. Including that, there are a lot of dragons that were designed from the get-go through computer graphics as 3D models. They didn’t consider animators at all during that design process so I struggled with that.

Audience member: Have you ever played the card game itself?

Hayama: I don’t have a clue about it.

Maruyama: Recently, I’ve been playing Duel Links.

Audience member: Of the different summoning mechanics — Normal summoning, Xyz, Synchro — which is the most difficult to incorporate into an action sequence?

Hayama: I don’t understand all the different summonings so I just try to have fun without caring about them.

Maruyama: Summonings and the transformation portions are probably one of the most inspiring, appealing portions of the anime so I make sure to use some variations so there’s not all the same recycled motions. I have fun trying to come up with different kinds of animations.

Kroze: Are there any transformation sequences from other shows that you’ve look to for inspiration for some of those summoning sequences?

Maruyama: Not really. Not any one in particular.

Audience member: Which of the Egyptian God Cards is the hardest to animate?

Hayama: I don’t know. Which one’s are the God Cards again?

[Maruyama lists them off for him.]

Hayama: Which one’s the blue one? That’s the hardest. All of them are hard to illustrate.

Audience member: I was assuming it would be Ra because of all the scales and everything. The yellow one.

Hayama: I try to forget about bad memories.

[The audience laughs.]

Maruyama: Back when God Cards were the thing in Duel Monsters, I was still just pretty new, so I struggled with all of them.

Audience member: Are there any other series’ animators who you respect and who you draw inspiration from?

Hayama: Once we go down that rabbit hole, there’s no end to it.

Maruyama: True, but…

Hayama: I worked on Fist of the North Star. During that time, the character designer, Masami Suda, was like my mentor figure. A lot of my work has many elements that I learned from him. At the same time, when I was someone who just enjoyed anime not as a professional but as a viewer, I believed some of his touches are kind of reminiscent of the original Gundam series.

Maruyama: I learned a lot of things from [Takahiro] Kagami, one of the animation directors from Duel Monsters. A lot of my works are similar to his style.

Kroze: Is there anything in Yu-Gi-Oh! that you haven’t worked on that you want to work on? Like GX.

Hayama: As long as I get paid, I don’t care.

[The audience laughs.]

Maruyama: If I get asked to, I will be happy to do it.

Audience member: Are there any American series that influence your art?

Hayama: I watch The Simpsons. I also watch a lot of American comic series, from Marvel and DC. I watch them just for fun, but if I see something interesting, like certain layouts or designs, I might get inspiration from them.

Maruyama: I watch Pixar for fun, but I don’t think it really inspires my work because the styles are completely different.

Audience member: Have either of you worked with the creator of Yu-Gi-Oh!, Kazuki Takahashi?

Hayama: Nope.

Maruyama: I just said hi to him once.

[The audience commiserates with him — “Aww.”]

Hayama: I would like to meet him for a very personal reason. Takahashi worked on a spin-off manga of the anime Go-Q-Choji Ikkiman by Toei Animation. I was a fan of the show so I want to meet Takahashi just for that personal reason.

[Note: The Go-Q-Choji Ikkiman anime and manga aren’t available in English. According to the Go-Q-Choji Ikkiman Japanese Wikipedia entry, the manga was serialized in Kodansha’s Weekly Shonen Magazine in 1986 and was compiled into two graphic novel volumes. Takahashi worked on it using the pen name “Kazuo Takahashi.” -ravegrl]

Audience member: When you’re not animating, what’s your favorite thing to do at home?

Hayama: Rest assured, I don’t work all the time. I watch movies and drink a lot. The usual things.

Maruyama: Same.

Audience member: How did you get into the animation industry?

Hayama: Back when I was in high school, my friend’s brother was involved in an anime production. I mentioned to my friend that I might want to be an animator some day. “Oh, you want me to introduce my brother to you?” So I met him and asked if there’s a special school for this. “No, don’t do it. Don’t do it.” Two months later, I find myself introduced to a new company. After five minutes of introductions and a simple interview, they were like, “When are you going to come?” I started in April and the rest is history.

Maruyama: I went to a special school for animation. From there, I met the first company that I worked for, and now I’m here.

Kroze: Seeing as how this franchise has had a lot of people work on it, is there anything that either of you feel like you’ve contributed that you hope makes a lasting impression on the franchise as it moves onward?

Hayama: I will leave that to the viewers and the audience’s discretion.

Maruyama: I hope the character designs will stay intact as long as the series does continue.

Audience member: For Maruyama, you’ve talked about how you’ve drawn inspiration from animation director [Takahiro] Kagami. Do you know the story behind why, in so many of Kagami’s episodes, Joey is often shown making a tough-guy pointy-chin face?

Maruyama: Kagami really likes Antonio Inoki, who is a well-known pro wrestler in Japan. Kagami is a fan of him and so he played around with the thought that maybe Joey really likes pro wrestling. So in certain scenes, he added some references to some pro wrestlers in terms of their facial expressions or emotions or playfulness.

Audience member: Apart from the card game, Yu-Gi-Oh! known mostly for the hair. Which character’s hair is the most difficult for you to draw?

Hayama: Tristan. Tristan has a distinctive pointy hair style. What makes it difficult is that it really depends on the angle it is seen pointing. [The subsequent explanation is inaudible because of the excessive laughter from the audience.] That makes it difficult because the angle really changes his hairstyle. I saw the character design and was like, you’ve got to be kidding me.

Maruyama: The character Vector in Yu-Gi-Oh! ZEXAL. His hair is very hard to draw. Similar to Tristan, the angle really dictates how the hairstyle looks. In the show Ashita no Joe, the main character has a very interesting hairstyle as well. Depending on the angle, the hair goes on one side or the other. Even if he looks straight forward, it still goes a little to the left or right. Likewise, for Vector, I really have to think about how, if I am looking straight at him, how the hair would look.

Audience member: If you have the chance to create your own monster card or Yu-Gi-Oh! card, what ideas would you have for it?

Hayama: I won’t know until I try.

Maruyama: I will try to design a cute girl, like Dark Magician Girl.

Audience member: In Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D’s, the final villain, Z-One, has a really interesting design. Where did the idea for his design originate?

Maruyama: I didn’t design him so I have no idea. But the first time I saw that design, I said that looks really tedious.

[Note: The actual designer of Z-One is Shinichi Miyazaki, who is credited in the endings of episode 65 and onward for his “Concept Design Cooperation.” Miyazaki recently tweeted an early design sketch and character concepts for Z-One. -ravegrl]

Audience member: Did you enjoy working on ZEXAL more or 5D’s? Which one was more fun?

Maruyama: I had more fun with ZEXAL because it was a little more colorful and playful. In 5D’s, very early on, the main character gets arrested. That sets up the tone of the show to be kind of dark. I think it’s not my actual output that is dark, but that darkness is something that I have to keep in the back of my mind when I’m actually illustrating.

Kroze: Speaking of 5D’s, the show, like you said, has a very dark tone. While manga is always black and white, 5D’s definitely has a very prominent “color” to it that makes its darkness feel entrenching. Is there anything that you looked at that inspired how you approached the darkness there?

Maruyama: There are actually dedicated people that deal with the color tone and the director and the people that handle this idea. They handle the tone of the colors and they make sure it’s all consistent with the story and throughout the series. So I didn’t have much of a say in the actual color.

Audience member: In the Dark Side of Dimensions movie, Kaiba and Mokuba don’t have their lockets on. Do you know why their lockets aren’t included in the movie even though they always wore them in the TV anime and manga?

Maruyama: I have no idea. I was given the designs from the directors. There’s nothing that took place in the background that we know of or any theories we can verify.

Audience member: Was there ever a time you had to animate something where you said no, you couldn’t do it, or had to change the way it was animated because it was too difficult to create?

Hayama: There were many occasions where I’ve thought it’s impossible to do a certain thing within a certain given schedule. Before I decide to accept the job, I make sure it’s something that I can finish. Because if you do accept the job that’s nearly impossible to do, you will always experience something bad.

Maruyama: No comment. [Laughs.]

Audience member: Do you have any favorite old American action movies?

Hayama: Escape from New York.

Maruyama: Back to the Future.

Interpreter: Is it a sin to have never watched that movie?

Kroze: What?! Are you serious?

Hayama: You’re joking! How sad.

Audience member: In Duel Monsters, Noa’s story arc wasn’t in the manga. What is it like drawing something that doesn’t have a source material?

Hayama: Even during Noa’s arc, I was just an animator, so I wasn’t part of the actual major staff. The director and the scriptwriter are the ones who make the decisions about the details. But, having said that, I did feel that it was kind of different than usual, that it was kind of weird. But a job is a job.

Maruyama: What Hayama said.

Kroze: I have a final question for both of you. This is a little bit of a silly one, but the phrase “the heart of the cards” is used many times in the series. What do you believe the heart of the cards means?

Hayama: Sorry, I have no idea.

Maruyama: I’ve never heard of that.

[The audience laughs.]

Interpreter: “Kādo no kokoro wo shinjiru” — “To believe in the heart of the cards.” [The interpreter places his index and middle fingers on top of his wrist, as if he were pausing before drawing a card.]

Hayama & Maruyama: Aaah!

Hayama: It’s a fully mental thing. Probably a full mental hypnosis.

Shuji Maruyama and Junichi Hayama’s Yu-Gi-Oh! Illustrations at Youmacon 2018

While the animators were answering questions during the Draw of the Cards panel, they were also busy putting pen to paper. What were they drawing? This panel was technically a Q&A panel, not a live drawing panel, so there were no cameras set up that pointed at their papers. So, the audience would just have to be surprised.

At the end of the panel, Shuji Maruyama and Junichi Hayama revealed what they had been working on and invited the audience to approach them and take photos.

Maruyama wowed the crowd with his Yusei Fudo and Jack Atlas:

Yusei Fudo and Jack Atlas illustrations, drawn live by Shuji Maruyama at Youmacon on November 3, 2018

Close-up of Yusei Fudo in an illustration drawn live by Shuji Maruyama at Youmacon on November 3, 2018

Close-up of Jack Atlas in an illustration drawn live by Shuji Maruyama at Youmacon on November 3, 2018

Hayama’s Seto Kaiba and Yami Yugi left the audience awestruck:

Seto Kaiba and Yami Yugi illustrations, drawn live by Junichi Hayama at Youmacon on November 3, 2018

Close-up of Seto Kaiba in an illustration drawn live by Junichi Hayama at Youmacon on November 3, 2018

Close-up of Yami Yugi in an illustration drawn live by Junichi Hayama at Youmacon on November 3, 2018

Needless to say, everyone was astonished by the works Maruyama and Hayama managed to turn out while they were casually chatting with the audience. They are both truly masters of their craft.

These are the only two Yu-Gi-Oh! pieces that Hayama drew the entire weekend.

Maruyama, however, created more Yu-Gi-Oh! illustrations at other live drawing and Q&A panels that weren’t specifically dedicated to Yu-Gi-Oh!.

Here is another take on Yusei and Jack by Maruyama. This photo is from fellow animator Mamoru Yokota (@yokotamamoru).

Yusei Fudo and Jack Atlas together, drawn live by Shuji Maruyama at Youmacon on November 2, 2018

Seto Kaiba was a very popular request for Maruyama. He drew Kaiba and Blue-Eyes White Dragon twice using two different styles at two different panels:

Seto Kaiba drawing a card with Blue-Eyes White Dragon, drawn live by Shuji Maruyama at Youmacon on November 3, 2018

Seto Kaiba standing with Blue-Eyes White Dragon, drawn live by Shuji Maruyama at Youmacon on November 4, 2018

All of these illustrations by Maruyama and Hayama were given away to lucky audience members.

On Facebook, Yu-Gi-Oh! voice actress Erica Schroeder, who was also a guest at Youmacon, shared a story and photo of how she had the great fortune of running into Shuji Maruyama in her hotel lobby. After Maruyama learned that Akiza Izinski is her favorite character that she has played, he whipped up an original illustration for Erica in minutes.

Erica Schroeder, Shuji Maruyama, and Maruyama's illustration of Akiza Izinski

Truly a moment she won’t ever forget!

At Youmacon’s Artists Alley, the animators had their own table set up where they accepted a very limited number of commissions over the weekend. When they weren’t attending panels or sightseeing in Detroit, they were busy drawing at their table. Youmacon attendees could commission an original piece of monochrome or full-color artwork on a shikishi — a hard paper board often used in Japan for autographs, paintings, and calligraphy.

Shuji Maruyama displayed two sample shikishi at the table — one with a color drawing of Yuma Tsukumo with Astral, and another with a monochrome drawing of Yami Yugi and Seto Kaiba standing back to back.

Yuma Tsukumo, Astral, Yami Yugi, and Kaiba illustrations on two shikishi by Shuji Maruyama at Youmacon 2018

Yuma Tsukumo and Astral illustration on a shikishi by Shuji Maruyama at Youmacon 2018

Yami Yugi and Seto Kaiba illustration on a shikishi by Shuji Maruyama at Youmacon 2018

Throughout the weekend, all of the animators held autograph sessions where they each offered posters to fans that featured original illustrations from anime series that they’ve worked on.

Junichi Hayama’s print showed Saichi Sugimoto and Asirpa from Golden Kamuy. But Shuji Maruyama’s print was this masterpiece of Yusei Fudo, Jack Atlas, and Yami Yugi:

Shuji Maruyama's original print with Yusei Fudo, Jack Atlas, and Yami Yugi illustrations

Want to see Shuji Maruyama and Junichi Hayama at more events? Contact your nearest anime convention’s guest relations staff and let them know!

Follow Shuji Maruyama on Twitter, @masyuu_nemunemu.

And follow Junichi Hayama on Twitter, @hayama11.

* * *

If you enjoyed hearing from Shuji Maruyama and Junichi Hayama, check out my coverage of Youmacon 2017, where Hayama made his first American convention appearance. At that event, Hayama spoke in greater depth about his background, techniques, and the animation industry.

(Questions and answers have been edited for clarity and readability.)

Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V Manga Volume 4 Available Now

November 6, 2018 at 7:00 pm | Posted in ARC-V, Yu-Gi-Oh! | Leave a comment
Tags:

Cover of Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V, Volume 4, from VIZ Media, digital edition

The latest Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V graphic novel is out today from VIZ Media. Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V, Volume 4, “Immortal Beings!!” includes chapters 20 through 25, first seen in Weekly Shonen Jump. Pick up the print edition for $9.99 or the digital edition for $6.99.

When Ren makes a grand reappearance after being summoned by Yuya for a duel, Yugo seizes the opportunity to settle the score with a Turbo Duel. But when Yugo’s consciousness begins fading in the middle of the action, Yuya is forced to take over. Does he have the skills to win after training on a Duel Runner for only a short period of time? Then, Reiji Akaba meets one of Eve’s assassins, Isaac, for a duel in outer space. But Isaac isn’t just another duelist. As a friend and classmate of Adam and Eve, Isaac knows all about the origin of Genesis Omega Dragon. What answers will Akaba get from this mysterious scientist?

This issue’s extras spotlight the signature dragons of Yuya, Yuto, Yugo, and Yuri. Illustrator Naohito Miyoshi shows off early design sketches of Odd-Eyes Phantom Dragon, Dark Anthelion Dragon, Clear Wing Fast Dragon, and Starving Venemy Dragon and comments on their naming and designs. The print edition of this manga also includes an Ultra Rare White Aura Bihamut card, Ren’s fearsome new Synchro monster that makes its first appearance in this volume.

Previously:
Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V Manga Volume 3 Available Now

4K Media’s Yu-Gi-Oh! October 2018 Sweepstakes

October 28, 2018 at 8:00 am | Posted in Konami | Leave a comment
Tags: , ,

Yu-Gi-Oh! October 2018 Sweepstakes banner from YUGIOH.com

4K Media has returned with an end-of-the-month giveaway featuring some new Yu-Gi-Oh! cards and toys. The Yu-Gi-Oh! October 2018 Sweepstakes offers one lucky person a chance to win a prize pack containing the following items:

  • Five Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG Soul Fusion booster packs. This set was released about a week ago and includes new cards used by Playmaker, Soulburner, and Go Onizuka.
  • One Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG Legendary Hero Decks box, which features decks used and inspired by Aster Phoenix, Team Ragnarok, and Yuto.
  • One Blue-Eyes White Dragon and one Summoned Skull TOTAKU figure. First announced in August 2017, these are part of the TOTAKU collection — GameStop’s own line of collectible four-inch figures that highlights various game franchises.
  • One Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V Season 1 DVD box set from Cinedigm.

This sweepstakes is open to all residents of the 50 United States and Washington, D.C., who are ages 6 years and up. The entry period ends on November 8. See the official rules for more details.

Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V in VIZ’s Fall 2018 WSJ Jump Pack

October 27, 2018 at 10:00 am | Posted in ARC-V, Yu-Gi-Oh! | Leave a comment
Tags: ,

Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V manga panel in the Weekly Shonen Jump Fall 2018 Jump Pack and an Apprentice Illusion Magician promo card

The print edition of VIZ Media’s Weekly Shonen Jump magazine is back again with the Fall 2018 Jump Pack. This semiannual 96-page magazine is available now at your nearest U.S. Scholastic book fair and previews three popular titles and a new science fiction adventure series. Here is what you can look forward to:

  • Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V, chapter 5
  • Astra Lost in Space, chapter 1
  • Dragon Ball Super, chapter 3
  • My Hero Academia, chapter 6

As usual, Yu-Gi-Oh! collectors and new duelists won’t want to miss the extras:

  • An Ultra Rare Apprentice Illusion Magician card (JMPS-EN007), a reprint of the wildly popular WSJ subscriber-exclusive promo card from 2017.
  • A coupon for any one Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG Starter Deck, redeemable at your neighborhood Official Tournament Store (OTS).
  • A double-sided fold-out Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG beginner’s guide with game mat.
  • A 20-card Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG demo deck that accompanies the guide.
  • A promo code for $5 off a one-year subscription (48 issues) of VIZ’s digital Weekly Shonen Jump magazine, where you can find simulpubbed manga like Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V.

Look for the Weekly Shonen Jump Fall 2018 Jump Pack at Scholastic book fairs in thousands of schools across the U.S. for $10.99. You don’t need to be affiliated with a school to shop at its book fair. Everyone is welcome, and a portion of all sales are given back to the school. Read some great manga and financially support a local school!

Previously:
Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V in VIZ’s Spring 2018 WSJ Jump Pack

Cover of VIZ Media's Weekly Shonen Jump Fall 2018 Jump Pack

Table of Contents of the Weekly Shonen Jump Fall 2018 Jump Pack

Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG cards and extras included with the Weekly Shonen Jump Fall 2018 Jump Pack

Close-up of the Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG Apprentice Illusion Magician card included with the Weekly Shonen Jump Fall 2018 Jump Pack

Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V, Scale 39: ‘Across Time and Space!!’

October 22, 2018 at 6:00 pm | Posted in ARC-V, Yu-Gi-Oh! | Leave a comment
Tags:

Yuya Sakaki saying his catchphrase in Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V manga chapter 39

Using the strength that Yuto, Yuri, and Yugo leave behind, Yuya unleashes the power of the Adam Factor and calls forth God-Eyes Phantom Dragon. Yuya wipes the tears from his eyes, knowing that they leave him with the greatest power of all: hope. A smile now beams across his face.

“Ladies and gentlemen!! The fun starts now!!” Yuya proclaims. “Here comes my entertainment duel!!”

Yuya orders God-Eyes to attack G.O.D. But how can his monster’s 3000 attack strength stand up to G.O.D.’s 4000? G.O.D., puzzled by Yuya’s actions, uses its attack-negating effect anyway, placing Nova Portal in its Pendulum zone to stop God-Eyes in its tracks. Yuya’s monster, it’s eyes blazing brilliantly, lets out a hair-raising roar before unleashing a wave of energy from its body.

“And now for my battle phase!!” declares Yuya. God-Eyes’ attack has now doubled to 6000.

G.O.D. is mortified. How can Yuya still attack? It realizes that Yuya has tapped into the power of the Adam Factor to control space-time. When God-Eyes’ attack was negated, Yuya was able to skip his opponent’s next turn and advance to his own battle phase.

Yuya uses another of God-Eyes’ abilities to raise its own strength and lower G.O.D.’s as it attacks. G.O.D. is forced to use its attack-negating powers again to add another Nova Portal to its Pendulum zone to stop Yuya’s attack. But Yuya simply uses God-Eyes’ time-skipping powers again. With G.O.D’s Pendulum zones now full, victory is at hand for Yuya.

G.O.D. guffaws at Yuya’s grit. Did Yuya forget Nova Portal’s Pendulum effect? G.O.D. uses that effect to destroy both Nova Portals, clearing the way for it to use its attack-stopping ability once again.

Yuya pretending to fall for G.O.D.'s tricks in Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V manga chapter 39

Yuya sneers. He has one more of God-Eyes’ effects up his sleeve. By sending one of his face-down spell or trap cards to the graveyard, he is able to negate the effect of Nova Portal. This time, it really is over.

“You gave people hope, but you planned to trick them the whole time!” Yuya exclaims. “Now do you see how cruel that was?! This is what you did!”

Yuya commands God-Eyes Phantom Dragon to attack. God-Eyes opens its mouth and cries out, and its breath disintegrates G.O.D.’s body. The G.O.D. card floating in the sky overhead glows as it absorbs the monster back within it.

Eve is unconscious and floating prone in the air right below the card. She slowing descends. A bright light emanates just below her and a body materializes. It’s Adam. He catches her and cradles her in his arms. Eve wakes up and the two embrace.

Thoughts

Even amid such terrible danger, Yuya remembers to entertain. Attaboy, Yuya. We haven’t seen you like this in so long.

Another Phantom Dragon! Yuya — “The Phantom” — started his journey with a Phantom Dragon, and now he defeats the big baddie with another. Very gratifying, even though God-Eyes Phantom Dragon is basically tailor-made to defeat G.O.D., haha. G.O.D. plays the same moves in this chapter as he did in the previous, but this time God-Eyes alone is enough to stop it. It’s also very gratifying that God-Eyes uses Eve’s time manipulation powers against her. I’m a little sad that G.O.D. never broke out of its chains though.

I hope I’m not the only one to feel that Eve and Adam’s reunion is too short. It’s a sweet moment, but it’s marred by Adam’s justification for Eve’s actions — that she is simply a part of G.O.D.’s plan and that she is blameless. What?! Oh no you didn’t! After an entire story full of superficial and inconsequential religious references, it dares to bring up such a heavy suggestion at the climax? C’mon…

Eve’s actions destroyed countless worlds. Yuya’s brothers are gone forever now. Yuya’s life, already a tragedy, will never be the same. And yet he stands there calmly, satisfied that he saved the world and reunited a couple.

Yuya, your fortitude is godly.

* * *

Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V, Scale 39: “Across Time and Space!!” is available now in VIZ Media’s Weekly Shonen Jump No. 47 (October 22, 2018). Grab the issue from VIZ, Amazon, and comiXology.

Previous chapter:
Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V, Scale 38: “Our Pride!!”

Next chapter:
Coming soon

Also available now:
– Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V: Volume 1, Volume 2, Volume 3

Kazuki Takahashi’s THE COMIQ in Weekly Shonen Jump

October 15, 2018 at 3:00 pm | Posted in Other Stuff | 2 Comments
Tags:

Close-up of Ryota Sakamaki in THE COMIQ chapter 1

Yu-Gi-Oh! creator Kazuki Takahashi’s new manga, THE COMIQ, is here! Today, VIZ Media begins simulpubbing this limited series in its Weekly Shonen Jump magazine.

THE COMIQ tells the story of Ryota Sakamaki, a rookie manga creator who just debuted his first title, Pendulum of Love. With the help of his editor, Sakamaki employs an assistant to help him draw his manga’s background art — an assistant that he has never seen or met. When Pendulum of Love catches the eye of a police detective, Sakamaki realizes that his assistant’s background art is hiding a bloody secret…

“For the 50th anniversary of Shonen Jump, I created something with the theme of ‘manga.’ I’d be ecstatic if you give it a chance!” says Takahashi in the magazine’s author comments section.

If you love Takahashi’s work, then give this murder mystery manga a shot! And if you enjoy THE COMIQ, please vote for it each week in VIZ’s WSJ survey. If enough people like it, maybe the chapters will eventually be compiled and sold as a graphic novel.

THE COMIQ Chapters and Weekly Shonen Jump Survey Links

This post will be updated with links to the chapters as they become available. WSJ is $0.99 per issue, or $25.99 for a 48-issue (1-year) subscription.

Chapter 1 in Weekly Shonen Jump No. 46 (October 15, 2018):
* VIZ.com (Web/Android/iOS) / Amazon / comiXology / Google Play Books
* October 15 Survey

Chapter 2 in Weekly Shonen Jump No. 47 (October 22, 2018):
* VIZ.com (Web/Android/iOS) / Amazon / comiXology / Google Play Books
* October 22 Survey

Chapter 3 in Weekly Shonen Jump No. 48 (October 29, 2018):
* VIZ.com (Web/Android/iOS) / Amazon / comiXology / Google Play Books
* October 29 Survey

Chapter 4 in Weekly Shonen Jump No. 49 (November 5, 2018):
* VIZ.com (Web/Android/iOS) / Amazon / comiXology / Google Play Books
* November 5 Survey

Chapter 5 in Weekly Shonen Jump No. 50 (November 12, 2018):
* VIZ.com (Web/Android/iOS) / Amazon / comiXology / Google Play Books
* November 12 Survey

Chapter 6: Coming soon

Product Summary

THE COMIQ
By: Kazuki Takahashi
Magazine: Weekly Shonen Jump
Publisher: VIZ Media
Translation: Stefan Koza
English Lettering: Sabrina Heep
Manga Editing: John Bae
Editor in Chief: Andy Nakatani
MSRP: $0.99/issue

VIZ Media to Publish Kazuki Takahashi’s THE COMIQ Short Manga Series

October 6, 2018 at 11:30 am | Posted in Japanese, Other Stuff | 3 Comments
Tags:

Preview of Kazuki Takahashi's THE COMIQ

Yu-Gi-Oh! creator Kazuki Takahashi is returning to Shueisha’s Weekly Shonen Jump! In honor of the magazine’s 50th anniversary, Takahashi will debut a new manga titled “THE COMIQ.” This limited series will launch in issue #46 of WSJ on October 15. Chapter 1 contains 53 pages. The story is about a rookie manga creator’s manuscript and the secret it possesses. This news was unveiled in issue #45 of WSJ, which hit newsstands in Japan today instead of on its normal Monday date because of the Health and Sports Day holiday.

Also today, VIZ Media announced at its Shonen Jump panel at New York Comic Con that it will serialize THE COMIQ in its English-language magazine.

(h/t ANN. Image from @VIZMedia.)

Jump Force Trailer Reveals Yugi’s Fighting Abilities, Battle Ship

October 5, 2018 at 6:00 pm | Posted in Duel Monsters, Yu-Gi-Oh! | Leave a comment
Tags:

Yugi commanding Dark Magician and Dark Magician Girl to attack in Jump Force

When Bandai Namco Entertainment announced that Yugi would be fighting using his monsters in the upcoming Jump Force video game, they weren’t kidding. A new trailer posted by the publisher reveals Dark Magician and Dark Magician Girl using energy-based attacks and holding their own against Toguro from Yu Yu Hakusho, Freeza from Dragon Ball, and Sosuke Aizen from Bleach. Yugi is also shown dramatically summoning Slifer the Sky Dragon from a card. Yugi himself doesn’t appear to do any physical fighting.

The trailer also provides a potential clue about the story in Jump Force. Yugi is fighting in the newly revealed Golden Gate Bridge stage, the locale of a chaotic scene. Vehicles are piled up and overturned on and around the bridge. Statues from the Naruto universe’s Valley of the End have altered the landscape of the iconic bridge, while a flag featuring the symbol of the Village Hidden in the Leaves is shown fluttering. Could the universes of Shonen Jump be melding with our real world?

What would our world be like if the Yu-Gi-Oh! universe invades? We may already have an answer. Several shots from the trailer reveal Kaiba’s Battle Ship (called Kaiba Kraft 3 in 4Kids’ English anime) flying in the background. Is that just for effect? Or could it be another stage or part of the story?

If you are at New York Comic Con this weekend, check out the Bandai Namco booth (#515) where you can play a demo of Jump Force. Alas, Yugi is not one of the playable characters in this demo, but you can still have fun with Goku, Luffy, and several other iconic characters.

Previously:
Yugi Confirmed Playable in Jump Force Video Game, Fights Using Monsters

STARZ Removes Yu-Gi-Oh!

September 30, 2018 at 6:00 am | Posted in Duel Monsters, English dubbed, Yu-Gi-Oh! | 4 Comments
Tags:

Seto Kaiba, dropping his cards and losing his duel, as envisioned by Ishizu in episode 94

As of today, STARZ is no longer streaming the Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters anime on its platform. The premium cable network had added season 1 of the Yu-Gi-Oh! English dub to its catalog in April 2017. It did not add the remaining four seasons.

Currently, STARZ still has the Yu-Gi-Oh! Bonds Beyond Time and Yu-Gi-Oh! The Dark Side of Dimensions movies.

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.