Digital Manga Sale: $2 Off All Yu-Gi-Oh! Volumes on All Platforms

August 13, 2019 at 9:00 am | Posted in 5D's, ARC-V, Duel Monsters, GX, Series 1, Yu-Gi-Oh!, ZEXAL | Leave a comment
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VIZ Media's Yu-Gi-Oh! digital sale August 2019 ad on comiXology

It’s time to d-d-d-d-d-download some volumes of Yu-Gi-Oh! manga! This week, VIZ Media is putting every Yu-Gi-Oh! volume on sale on every major e-book platform. All 75 volumes currently available, from Kazuki Takahashi’s original Yu-Gi-Oh! story to the latest Yu-Gi-Oh! ARC-V volume, is $4.99 — that’s $2 off the regular price of $6.99 (and half off the $9.99 price of a printed book!).

Check VIZ’s website for links to buy each volume:

This sale starts today, August 13, and ends on August 19. The discount applies to all books sold on VIZ’s app/website, comiXology, Google Play Books, Apple Books, Kindle (Amazon), and Nook (Barnes & Noble).

Keep an eye on VIZ’s digital sale page for new manga deals every week.

Kazuki Takahashi at MAGIC 2019, Part 4: Live Drawing

April 18, 2019 at 10:00 pm | Posted in Duel Monsters, Other Stuff, Series 1, Yu-Gi-Oh! | 2 Comments
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Kazuki Takahashi preparing to draw live at MAGIC 2019, with Sahé Cibot

After his question-and-answer session, Kazuki Takahashi had one more treat for attendees at MAGIC 2019.

“As the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words,” said Matthieu Pinon, the panel’s moderator. “So, Mr. Takahashi will now draw in front of you to thank you for the support you have given him during his career.”

On the table in front of Takahashi was a large wire-bound drawing pad. Takahashi dried his hands on a handkerchief as a photographer set up a camera beside him. An image of the drawing pad appeared on the big screen above the stage. Before he even picked up a pen, the loudspeakers began blaring a fast-tempo song with choric chanting and raucous percussion.

Kazuki Takahashi drawing Yugi's eyes during his live drawing session at MAGIC 2019

It was the tail end of the song “Symphonic Suite DEVIL, Third Movement: eXORCiST” by Hiroyuki Sawano from the first Blue Exorcist soundtrack. And honestly, I found the music to be extremely obnoxious. Its blazing fast pace made it feel like this would be a speed drawing event. Certainly the convention wanted epic music to accompany this epic moment, but I remembered that when Takahashi participated in a live drawing session at San Diego Comic Con 2015, he had requested quiet from the audience. I felt bad for him.

Kazuki Takahashi drawing Yugi's face and head during his live drawing session at MAGIC 2019

But Kazuki Takahashi is a master of his craft. If he was bothered by the music, it certainly didn’t show. He soldiered on with an intense focus, beginning his illustration with Yugi’s eyes.

Kazuki Takahashi drawing part of Yugi's shirt collar and the outline of his hair at his live drawing session at MAGIC 2019

At SDCC 2015, Takahashi had described the importance of Yugi’s eyes in determining his look, and that the first part of Yugi he draws is always his eyes. This was still true here at MAGIC.

Kazuki Takahashi drawing more of Yugi's hair and his chain at his live drawing session at MAGIC 2019

Eventually, the music changed to “Darkness” from the Thunderbolt Fantasy soundtrack, also by Hiroyuki Sawano. Its slower, but nonetheless grand, melody was a welcome change.

Kazuki Takahashi drawing and shading more of Yugi's clothes at his live drawing session at MAGIC 2019

Takahashi didn’t make any sketches using a pencil; he immediately began inking. He was using Mckee oil-based marker pens by Zebra, which have a nib on each side, thick and thin. He started with the thinnest point has he drew Yugi’s eyes and face, then switched to a thicker point as he drew the outlines of Yugi’s hair.

Kazuki Takahashi drawing more of Yugi's hair and adding layers at his live drawing session at MAGIC 2019

Takahashi used the thickest point of his pens to shade Yugi’s clothes and add layers to Yugi’s hair.

Kazuki Takahashi shading more of Yugi's clothes at his live drawing session at MAGIC 2019

In just six short minutes, he was finished. Truly a master of his craft. He signed and dated his illustration.

Kazuki Takahashi signing his name on his completed illustration of Yugi at his live drawing session at MAGIC 2019

Then he posed for pictures.

Kazuki Takahashi posing with his illustration of Yugi at his live drawing session at MAGIC 2019, with Matthieu Pinon and Naoki Kawashima

Close-up of Kazuki Takahashi posing with his illustration of Yugi at his live drawing session at MAGIC 2019

Later, on Twitter, Cédric Biscay, the president and CEO of MAGIC’s organizer, Shibuya Productions, posted a close-up of Takahashi’s drawing.

Close-up of Kazuki Takahashi's Yugi illustration drawn live at MAGIC 2019
Photo by @CedricBiscay

Voilà! A stellar performance and a masterpiece from Kazuki Takahashi, the creator of Yu-Gi-Oh!, at MAGIC 2019.

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Next:
Kazuki Takahashi at MAGIC 2019, Part 5: More Photos

Previously:
Kazuki Takahashi at MAGIC 2019, Part 3: Interview

Kazuki Takahashi at MAGIC 2019, Part 3: Interview

April 10, 2019 at 2:00 pm | Posted in Duel Monsters, Japanese, Konami, Series 1, Yu-Gi-Oh! | 2 Comments
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Sahé Cibot and Kazuki Takahashi at MAGIC 2019 at Takahashi's Q&A panel

Kazuki Takahashi did more than judge a manga contest and sign autographs at MAGIC 2019. He also participated in a question-and-answer session where, for 25 minutes, he entertained the audience with candid insights about himself and his creations. Takahashi spoke about his start as an artist, the importance of creating dramatic cards and moments, the origin of the Blue-Eyes White Dragon, and even about a game he invented that failed to take off.

At MAGIC, all panels were conducted on stage in French. For attendees who only speak English, this wasn’t a problem if the guests were also English speakers. But for a panel like Takahashi’s, which was conducted in French and Japanese, the convention’s technology came to the rescue. Attendees could rent a pair of earphones and a receiver that allowed them to listen to an English interpretation of all the French dialogue spoken on stage.

Takahashi’s panel was the last one of the day, scheduled for 6:00 p.m. Sadly, it started very late and the auditorium, which could seat 400 people, was only about a quarter full. Nevertheless, the true fans in the room were all very enthusiastic. They made sure Takahashi could hear their cheers when he arrived on stage, even as the French Yu-Gi-Oh! theme song thundered from the loudspeakers as he entered.

Takahashi was accompanied on stage by his interpreter, Sahé Cibot, the general manager of Shibuya International and one of the manga contest’s judges. They were joined by Naoki Kawashima, deputy editor in chief of Shueisha’s Weekly Shonen Jump and fellow manga contest judge, although Kawashima did not speak during the panel. The moderator was Matthieu Pinon, a journalist and author who specializes in manga and anime topics.

This post contains a full transcript of Kazuki Takahashi’s Q&A panel.

Matthieu Pinon, Sahé Cibot, Kazuki Takahashi, and Naoki Kawashima at Takahashi's Q&A panel at MAGIC 2019
Left to right: Matthieu Pinon, Sahé Cibot, Kazuki Takahashi, and Naoki Kawashima

Matthieu Pinon: Good evening, everyone. Thank you for waiting for this grand moment, this extraordinary meeting with Mr. Takahashi, the author of the manga Yu-Gi-Oh!, whom you all know because you are all passionate about manga and Japanese pop culture. To begin this conference, we will first ask Mr. Takahashi, what manga did you read when you were a child? What manga did you like to read?

Kazuki Takakashi: Honestly, I liked to watch Japanese tokusatsu [special effects] TV shows where kaiju appear, like the Ultraman series and Kamen Rider. These are what led me to want to draw.

Pinon: So drawing is all well and good as a hobby, but at some point you decided to become a professional. What motivated you to move in this direction?

Takahashi: Since I loved to draw, I wanted to make it my career. Before I was a manga author, I was an illustrator and also worked on video games. Then I started developing manga.

Pinon: You just talked about video games. At the time Yu-Gi-Oh! launched, video games had exploded in popularity in Japan. Then you came along with Yu-Gi-Oh!, which was a table-top game, something that might seem a bit old-fashioned compared to the current trend. Was your editor surprised when you presented this project?

Takahashi: No, not at all. Back when I was working at a game company, it was an era of martial arts video games where players could take control of characters and make them fight. So, it was less interesting to create a manga about martial arts. It was more special, more different to make a manga about table-top games, which are analog and more traditional.

Pinon: There are many table-top games in the world. And when Yu-Gi-Oh! first debuted, the manga included several categories of games. When you launched the card game, that’s when the manga became a success. This success is thanks to you [the audience] and the editors. How did public interest in the Yu-Gi-Oh! card game manifest itself?

Takahashi: When the manga began, the original concept was to show various ways of battling using games each week. At first, I wasn’t even thinking about a card game. Cards were just one of those games. After drawing them for two weeks, there was such an overwhelming reaction from the readers that I decided to make the manga into a series about cards as a response to their request.

Kazuki Takahashi speaking at his Q&A panel at MAGIC 2019, with Sahé Cibot and Naoki Kawashima

Pinon: To first explain how readers can express their interest, we have to remember that the magazines contain a small postcard in that back that readers can mail to the publication to specify which series they prefer. And it was right at the moment that the card games appeared in Yu-Gi-Oh! that the manga climbed further and further into the top 10. Speaking of cards, you didn’t just make these cards by happenchance; you actually developed rules for the game. Could you explain to us your process of creating a card? How did you determine its characteristics while taking into account the increase in the number of cards as the game progresses?

Takahashi: First, I created the story and decided how a character would play an active role in that story. Then I asked myself, what card would be the most dramatic when used by the protagonist while fighting against an opponent? Are fan-favorite characters playing an active role? From there I created each card.

Pinon: Could you tell us, briefly, how many cards you created for the game? Do you remember?

Takahashi: I’ve… Never counted before. Quite a lot, I guess. Like… A thousand.

Pinon: Around a thousand! I think that deserves a round of applause because a thousand cards is so–

[The audience applauds, drowning out Pinon.]

Pinon: And among these one thousand cards, the most famous is the Blue-Eyes White Dragon. But why a white dragon with blue eyes? Why not, say, a black phoenix with red eyes? Why did you choose this animal with this color and specifically this eye color?

Takahashi: I wanted to design a mystical and cool monster for Yugi’s first rival, Seto Kaiba, when he appeared for their first battle. That monster became the Blue-Eyes White Dragon. In a black-and-white world [of manga], I wanted its name to evoke a feeling that would allow readers to conjure up its colors. Ultimately, the Blue-Eyes White Dragon turns out to be a woman — a woman with white hair, white skin, and blue eyes who is revealed in the story to be a spirit.

Pinon: Does anyone out there have the Blue-Eyes White Dragon card?

[Many people in the audience raise their hands.]

Takahashi: Ah. [Nods.]

Pinon: Congratulations, you can show off to others.

[The audience laughs.]

Pinon: And when you watch Game of Thrones, you will get to see your card.[1]

[A few more chuckles from the audience.]

Pinon: Quite often, a duel in Yu-Gi-Oh! is more than a simple face-to-face confrontation between two players. Through the strategy of the opponents, players get to know one another better. It’s almost as if they are communicating through the cards. Was this important to you in your manga?

Takahashi: Yes, that’s right. Because the protagonist, Yugi, is a character that readers are rooting for, I always thought about how to give him a dramatic victory. For example, his trump card gets destroyed and he needs a come-from-behind win. I always thought about how to make such dramatic developments possible in narrative terms.

Kazuki Takahashi speaking at his Q&A panel at MAGIC 2019, with Matthieu Pinon and Sahé Cibot

Pinon: As we all see, MAGIC invites not only famous manga authors but also authors of [non-Japanese] comics. We know that you are a particular fan of this medium. What comic series do you read? Which do you follow with great interest?

Takahashi: I really like Mike Mignola. When it comes to BD, I really like Moebius.[2]

Pinon: Those of you who have been to Japan before might know that production of Japan’s own homegrown comics is quite important, so much so that foreign comics, whether French or American, are not well represented. Where did you find them, and how did you enter the world of comics?

Takahashi: There actually are places in Japan that sell American comics and I occasionally visit them to shop. I’ve always been a fan of American comics, especially stories about superheroes. I love the impactfulness of the artwork, a style that can’t be found in Japanese manga.

Pinon: You mentioned Mike Mignola. You had the opportunity to meet him and exchange drawings. He drew Yugi and you drew Hellboy. Could you tell us a little about this meeting? Because, when we see the drawings, it must have been quite the interesting encounter.[3]

Takahashi: I actually haven’t met him. I was excited to meet him at a comic convention but it didn’t work out. But we did end up collaborating. I drew Mike Mignola’s Hellboy while he drew Yugi.

Pinon: [You exchanged your drawings] through your publishers?

Sahé Cibot: Right.[4]

Pinon: For those of you who don’t know how Yu-Gi-Oh! ends, we aren’t going to spoil it for you, but you really should read the manga to the end because it’s quite exciting. The conclusion of Yu-Gi-Oh! is particularly successful. There are many manga that will simply stop, with publishers stating that their popularity is declining and that this is where they would draw the line. But you took great care to make a well-prepared ending. How did you plan this with your editor? Without revealing the ending to the reader, could you tell us how you prepared this well-developed, thoughtful ending?

Takahashi: When serialization of Yu-Gi-Oh! began, I had already decided that Yugi would meet the other Yugi — that he would meet his, umm, double — and that the two would fight in the end. I decided from the very beginning that Yugi would win.

[Cibot translates Takahashi’s answer into French, but leaves out his last statement that Yugi would win.]

Cibot: This is a huge spoiler, isn’t it?

[The audience laughs.]

Pinon: The ending is from 2004 so those who got spoiled are 15 years behind. We won’t blame you.

Cibot: Well, I didn’t say who won.

Pinon: This is so– Anyway.[5] Why was it important to you that he meet his double?

Takahashi: Well, it’s kind of like a multiple personality. The idea is that when the protagonist finds himself in trouble, a stronger version of himself appears. As the story progresses, he learns more about that other self and realizes that he must defeat him in order to become independent. Eventually, he does defeat his other self, grow, and become independent. This is the theme of the story.

Pinon: Sometimes, our greatest adversary is none other than ourselves. Two years ago, I believe, Yu-Gi-Oh! was developed into a smartphone mobile app. There was a monstrous promotional campaign in Tokyo where you could see billboards all over the Yamanote [railway line], the likes of which is completely unimaginable over here.[6] How did it make you feel seeing the analog game that you had designed shift into a video game?

Takahashi: Sure enough, in the manga, there was a rule that the game should absolutely not be taken in a digital direction. But we’re talking about Konami Digital Entertainment here, so…

[Takahashi and Naoki Kawashima laugh.]

Kazuki Takahashi glancing to his left and laughing at his Q&A panel at MAGIC 2019

Pinon: Time has moved on of course and video games are now available on smartphones that everyone can have in their hands. So time passed and in 2004, you stopped the manga. And for ten years, you supervised everything that was developed after that. Then, in 2013, you returned with a one-shot called DRUMP. What motivated you to create this manga?

Takahashi: I had the opportunity to do a one-shot. I thought of making the theme about card games. The Yu-Gi-Oh! card game is incredibly extensible, with rare cards and powerful cards constantly being introduced–

Pinon: It’s quite the catalog. I think some people have one or more binders that are stuffed full of cards.

Takahashi: On the other hand, I thought I could make an interesting game using playing cards, which are limited to 52 cards, so I created a manga based on that concept.[7]

Pinon: So in DRUMP, if you have a deck of 52 cards and a pencil, you can build and rebuild a [DRUMP] deck. You will only ever need 52 cards. Did this constraint help you create a crazy new concept? Or was it a barrier?

Takahashi: I did a lot of play-testing and found it to be a well-rounded game, so I created a story around it. I had fun drawing it and making the cards. It was interesting to play. I really wanted it to become popular, but compared to the power of Yu-Gi-Oh!, it paled in comparison. [Laughs.]

Pinon: As you may have noticed, we’re running a bit late so we’re going to have to cut this short. However, to finish, Mr. Takahashi, you don’t often have the opportunity to meet a Monacan or French audience. Perhaps you have something you would like to tell your fans, who have come and waited until the end of the day to see you. So if you have anything you would like to say, now is the time. Seize the moment.

Takahashi: More than 20 years have passed since Yu-Gi-Oh! began serialization. I am so grateful to be able to come to Monaco to interact with fans. I thank you all from the bottom of my heart for supporting Yu-Gi-Oh!.

Sahé Cibot and Kazuki Takahashi looking at the audience at MAGIC 2019 at Takahashi's Q&A panel

Interview Notes

1. ^ See Game of Thrones, season 7, episode 7.

2. ^ BD (bédé) is short for bande dessinée, a term describing comics of French or Belgian origin. Jean “Moebius” Giraud was a famous creator of BD.

3. ^ Takahashi’s and Mike Mignola’s illustrations were printed in VIZ Media’s September 2004 issue of Shonen Jump magazine.

Kazuki Takahashi's Hellboy artwork and Mike Mignola's Yugi artwork from VIZ Media's Shonen Jump, September 2004

As described in this issue, VIZ Media had asked Takahashi to draw his favorite American comic book character with Yu-Gi-Oh!-style hair, so he created the Hellboy drawing on the left. VIZ then contacted Mignola and he agreed to draw Hellboy clad in Yu-Gi-Oh! apparel. The two artists then exchanged these drawings.

4. ^ In this awkward exchange, the interpreter, Cibot, did not translate into Japanese the first part of Pinon’s statement about how Takahashi had exchanged drawings with Mignola. Instead, she asked if Takahashi had ever met Mignola before. That’s why Takahashi repeated the same information in his response.

5. ^ Another awkward exchange. Nothing was lost in translation here though. Takahashi ignored the no-spoiler request, hahaha.

6. ^ The mobile app that Pinon mentions is of course Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links. The Yamanote Line is a circular railway loop that connects Tokyo’s major city centers. The Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links billboards described by Pinon appeared in March 2017 and were well documented on social media and in Konami’s own video ads.

7. ^ The game Takahashi created is called DRUMP and uses a standard deck of 52 playing cards. The manga, also called DRUMP, was published in 2013 in Shueisha’s 49th issue of Weekly Shonen Jump magazine. It was not published in English or French.

(Questions and answers have been edited for clarity and readability.)

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Next:
Kazuki Takahashi at MAGIC 2019, Part 4: Live Drawing

Previously:
Kazuki Takahashi at MAGIC 2019, Part 2: Autographs

How to Read Every Yu-Gi-Oh! Manga Ever for Only $1.99

December 17, 2018 at 9:00 pm | Posted in 5D's, ARC-V, Duel Monsters, GX, Series 1, The Dark Side of Dimensions, Yu-Gi-Oh!, ZEXAL | 7 Comments
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Pegasus enjoying gorgonzola cheese, wine, and a comic in Yu-Gi-Oh! Duelist chapter 14

How much Yu-Gi-Oh! manga can you read in a month? With the arrival of VIZ Media’s new Shonen Jump today, it is now possible to read every Yu-Gi-Oh! and Yu-Gi-Oh! spin-off manga ever — that’s over 600 chapters and counting! — for just $1.99.

Yu-Gi-Oh! is only one series available in Shonen Jump’s vault of over 10,000 chapters, which is accessible for $1.99 per month. Almost all of the biggest Jump titles — Yu-Gi-Oh!, Bleach, Dragon Ball, My Hero Academia, Naruto, One Piece — are there. At launch, there are almost 90 titles, but more are on their way. How is VIZ making money on this?!

New users can receive a free seven-day trial to the vault by signing up on the web or using the Shonen Jump iOS or Android app. Current WSJ magazine subscribers, your membership already gives you access to the vault.

Here are the links to the Yu-Gi-Oh! series:

If there is a Jump imprint title that you want to read but it’s not available right at launch, rest assured that VIZ is fully aware of it. “We are working on it,” said Shonen Jump Editor in Chief Andy Nakatani in last week’s SJ podcast.

And if you enjoy a series and want to support it even more, please consider buying the graphic novel volumes, which contain additional content not seen with these individual chapters.

Happy reading!

Update (February 8, 2019): Yu-Gi-Oh! Transcend Game is no longer available.

UNIQLO’s Weekly Shonen Jump 50th Anniversary Yu-Gi-Oh! Shirts

May 4, 2018 at 7:00 pm | Posted in Duel Monsters, Japanese, Series 1, Yu-Gi-Oh! | 2 Comments
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Yami Yugi T-shirt by UNIQLO

Shueisha’s Weekly Shonen Jump magazine turns 50 years old this year! The home of Kazuki Takahashi’s Yu-Gi-Oh! manga, WSJ has teamed up with UNIQLO to develop Jump UT, a new line of T-shirts featuring the hottest WSJ series and characters. In the coming months, the Japanese casual wear maker will be selling 83 different shirt designs in its stores all over the world. Today, Jump UT made its debut in UNIQLO’s online and brick-and-mortar stores in the United States — and Yu-Gi-Oh! has the honor of being one of the first series included at launch!

Currently, there is one Yu-Gi-Oh! design available, pictured above, featuring Yami Yugi. The image is taken from the title page of chapter 200 of Yu-Gi-Oh! Duelist. This shirt is only available in kids sizes.

At least two more Yu-Gi-Oh! designs will be available in U.S. stores in the near future. One is a white T-shirt with the three Blue-Eyes White Dragon cards printed on the left breast. The other is a black T-shirt with Dark Magician in his iconic pose. These two shirts will arrive on May 25. These designs are already for sale on UNIQLO’s Japanese website, which lists both shirts as adult men’s cuts.

UNIQLO T-shirt designs featuring three Blue-Eyes White Dragon cards and Dark Magician

UNIQLO’s Jump UT shirts are $14.90 for adult sizes and $9.90 for kids sizes.

Which other Weekly Shonen Jump series will get their own UNIQLO shirts? How did UNIQLO select which designs to use? What special considerations went into developing Jump UT? For insights into this product line, check out the manga The Making of Jump UT!, available in VIZ Media’s free WSJ section.

And for more Yu-Gi-Oh! shirts, don’t forget to visit ShopYuGiOh.com.

Update (May 25): UNIQLO’s Blue-Eyes White Dragon and Dark Magician shirts are now up!

Yu-Gi-Oh! Manga 3-in-1 Edition, Vol. 1-13 Complete

February 6, 2018 at 12:00 pm | Posted in Duel Monsters, Series 1, Yu-Gi-Oh! | 1 Comment
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VIZ Media's Yu-Gi-Oh! 3-in-1 Edition, volumes 1 and 13, surrounded by some Millennium Items

Want to start collecting the Yu-Gi-Oh! manga in print? There’s no time like the present to kick things off. Today, VIZ Media released the final volume of its Yu-Gi-Oh! 3-in-1 Edition graphic novels — an affordable, space-saving collection of Kazuki Takahashi’s story. VIZ’s 3-in-1 omnibuses are the same trim size as its standard volumes, but are much less expensive with a suggested retail price of $14.99 each.

On its website, VIZ lists all 13 Yu-Gi-Oh! omnibuses with links to various online vendors where you can order the books:

The Yu-Gi-Oh! 3-in-1 Edition is available only in print, not digital.

Previously:
Yu-Gi-Oh! Manga Gets 3-in-1 Omnibus Re-release from VIZ Media

Toei’s 1998 Yu-Gi-Oh! Anime Given New Life by 200+ Animators

January 21, 2018 at 10:00 pm | Posted in Other Stuff, Series 1, Yu-Gi-Oh! | 3 Comments

Yu-Gi-Oh! Reanimate title card by Hailey 'Squiggly' Lain

What happens when over 220 animators and illustrators (and two cosplayers) get together to recreate an episode of Toei’s 1998 Yu-Gi-Oh! anime? “Yu-Gi-Oh! Reanimate” is a collaborative project featuring these talented Yu-Gi-Oh! fans. Each participant remade a shot from episode 2 of that series, commonly called “Season 0” by fans, and reimagined it with their own style, humor, and magic. Check out the final product on YouTube and Vimeo!

Yu-Gi-Oh! Reanimate was spearheaded by Phui Jing Ling, a Malaysian animator and cartoonist, and kicked off in September 2016. It includes the talents of 226 participants.

If you enjoyed Yu-Gi-Oh! Reanimate, check out these other creative crowdsourced collaborations:

  • Star Wars Uncut,” an Emmy Award-winning remake of A New Hope, released in 2009, and The Empire Strikes Back, released in 2014.
  • Moon Animate Make-Up!,” a remake of episode 28 of DiC Entertainment’s Sailor Moon anime. Released in 2014.
  • Seven Star Re-Animate,” a remake of Dragon Ball episode 8. Released in 2016.
  • The Mama Luigi Project,” a remake of the final episode of the Super Mario World cartoon, which is the origin of the infamous Mama Luigi meme. Released in 2017.

(News from the YGO Reanimate Tumblr)

Digital Manga Sale: All 38 Volumes of Yu-Gi-Oh!

January 4, 2018 at 12:00 am | Posted in Duel Monsters, Series 1, Yu-Gi-Oh! | 6 Comments
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VIZ Media's Yu-Gi-Oh! digital sale January 2018 ad banner

VIZ Media is having a sale on Kazuki Takahashi’s original Yu-Gi-Oh! manga! Through Monday, all digital volumes of Yu-Gi-Oh!, Yu-Gi-Oh! Duelist, and Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium World are priced at $4.99 each — that’s almost 30 percent off the regular price of $6.99, and 50 percent off the $9.99 price of a printed volume. Check out VIZ’s list of books with links to all the platforms where you can buy them:

This sale applies to all e-books sold on the VIZ app/website, comiXology, Google Play Books, iBooks, Kindle, and Nook.

Yu-Gi-Oh! Manga Editor Yoshihisa Heishi at NYCC 2017

October 12, 2017 at 11:00 pm | Posted in Duel Monsters, Japanese, Series 1, Yu-Gi-Oh! | Leave a comment
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Yoshihisa Heishi at the Weekly Shonen Jump panel at NYCC 2017

In Japan, manga editors are more than just people who know the nuts and bolts of the publishing industry. Editors work intimately with manga creators, exchanging story ideas and guiding the creators to success, and even look after the creators’ health and well-being. When Kazuki Takahashi’s Yu-Gi-Oh! manga was first serialized in Shueisha’s Weekly Shonen Jump magazine in Japan, its founding editor was Yoshihisa Heishi. Heishi eventually rose through the ranks to become the magazine’s editor in chief, and today still works at Shueisha’s shonen manga department as its director.

This past weekend, Heishi attended New York Comic Con where he was a guest at VIZ Media’s Weekly Shonen Jump panel. He offered some tidbits about Yu-Gi-Oh! and Takahashi during a brief Q&A.

“How did Egypt become such an important theme in the story?” asked Urian Brown, an editor at VIZ and the panel’s moderator.

“Before the manga started, Takahashi-sensei was really interested in Egypt and Egyptian culture,” explained Heishi through his translator, English WSJ Editor in Chief Andy Nakatani. “The Millennium Puzzle was originally not supposed to be used. It was going to be a different item. But since he ended up using the Millennium Puzzle, Egypt became a more important part of the story.”

“What was it supposed to be originally?” asked Brown.

“I can’t say,” Heishi laughed.

“What was it like working with Takahashi-sensei?” Brown continued. “Can you give us any details about his creative process?”

“When Takahashi-sensei was making the manga, I didn’t really see him having trouble or questioning himself when he was creating the manga,” replied Heishi. “He would go through the struggle unseen, not out in the forefront. Every week, they’d be playing card games and video games and things. He would play every week with his assistants. […] The ideas came from that.”

“Did you try out any of the dangerous Shadow Games in the manga, like yo-yos on the roof or the nitroglycerin air hockey?” asked Brown.

“No! Kids, please don’t do this at home.”

* * *

Check out video of the full panel for discussions and insights about even more Shonen Jump titles, like Rurouni Kenshin and My Hero Academia.

Related posts:
‘Spotlight on Yu-Gi-Oh! & Creator Kazuki Takahashi’ Panel at SDCC 2015

OverDrive: Free Yu-Gi-Oh! Manga E-Books from Your Local Library

May 19, 2017 at 9:00 pm | Posted in 5D's, Duel Monsters, GX, Series 1, Yu-Gi-Oh!, ZEXAL | 4 Comments
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Plenty of libraries already own VIZ Media’s many Yu-Gi-Oh! manga series on their shelves. And now, there’s a new option for Yu-Gi-Oh! and manga fans to borrow and read the series for free from their local library. VIZ Media announced last week that it has increased the number its titles available on OverDrive, a digital platform that distributes books, videos, and music to libraries across the globe. VIZ’s latest update makes 99 new series available to participating public and school libraries in the United States and Canada, including the following Yu-Gi-Oh! titles:

So what is OverDrive and how do you use it?

OverDrive is a digital reading platform; its app is available everywhere — on Android, iOS, Windows, Mac, the web, and more.

The first step to using OverDrive is to search for your local library and see if it is subscribed to OverDrive’s services. OverDrive is available in 90 percent of public libraries in the U.S.

Find a library on OverDrive

Once you locate a library, visit its website and search for a title. Let’s say you want to read volume 1 of Yu-Gi-Oh! Duelist.

Search for a title on OverDrive

It’s available! Click “Borrow” on the search results page…

Yu-Gi-Oh! Duelist Volume 1 available in the OverDrive search results

…or on the book’s details page.

A listing for Yu-Gi-Oh! Duelist Volume 1 on OverDrive

To borrow a book from OverDrive, you have to sign in with your library card. You do have one of these, right? If not, take a trip to your local library and apply for one. It’s free. (Or rather, you’ve already helped fund your local library with your tax dollars, so you might as well use it. Don’t underestimate the value of having a library’s services at your fingertips in this internet age!)

Sign in with a library card on OverDrive

Then, start reading.

Pages from the Yu-Gi-Oh! Duelist Volume 1 manga on OverDrive

Good stuff!

Placing a Hold

On OverDrive, VIZ’s Yu-Gi-Oh! e-books are available to libraries under the “one copy, one user” lending model. The library pays for a certain number of copies of a title and can only lend out that many copies at one time, exactly like a physical book on a shelf. So, there might be situations where an e-book you want to read isn’t available.

But don’t worry, you can place a hold on unavailable books. This option is available in the search results…

Wait-listed and available Yu-Gi-Oh! books in the OverDrive search results

…and on the book’s details page.

A listing for Yu-Gi-Oh! Volume 1 on OverDrive

When the book becomes available, it will automatically be checked out to your account and you’ll receive an email alert about it.

Recommend Yu-Gi-Oh! to Your Library

Libraries want to get books that people want to read, so even if your local library doesn’t offer any Yu-Gi-Oh! manga, it’s absolutely worth it to recommend it to them.

“The way that librarians find out if you want manga is to petition the libraries,” explained Laura Dooley, ‎digital publishing production manager at VIZ Media, in episode 198 of the Weekly Shonen Jump podcast. “But they may not know about it until you request it. That’s been really successful for us. People finding out about that and then contacting their local library.”

“It’s not like the library needs like a hundred people to request it before they do it,” added Jeff Ruberg, a software engineer at VIZ. “It probably needs just a couple.”

“Yeah, and they’re more willing to take a chance on e-books because it isn’t the same as physically taking up space in their catalog,” said Dooley.

OverDrive makes it easy to recommend books. The option is available on the search results page…

Unavailable Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium World books in the OverDrive search results

…and on a title’s details page.

A listing for Yu-Gi-Oh! Millennium World Volume 1 on OverDrive

While you’re at it, check out the list of all of VIZ’s manga titles available on OverDrive and see if there’s anything else you want to read. As of the end of February, about half of VIZ’s digital catalog is available to libraries, said Dooley, including a large selection of Jump series.

Read and support manga at your local library! You’re helping support the manga creators and industry when you do!

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