Kazuki Takahashi at MAGIC 2019, Part 3: Interview

April 10, 2019 at 2:00 pm | Posted in Duel Monsters, Japanese, Konami, Series 1, Yu-Gi-Oh! | 2 Comments
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Sahé Cibot and Kazuki Takahashi at MAGIC 2019 at Takahashi's Q&A panel

Kazuki Takahashi did more than judge a manga contest and sign autographs at MAGIC 2019. He also participated in a question-and-answer session where, for 25 minutes, he entertained the audience with candid insights about himself and his creations. Takahashi spoke about his start as an artist, the importance of creating dramatic cards and moments, the origin of the Blue-Eyes White Dragon, and even about a game he invented that failed to take off.

At MAGIC, all panels were conducted on stage in French. For attendees who only speak English, this wasn’t a problem if the guests were also English speakers. But for a panel like Takahashi’s, which was conducted in French and Japanese, the convention’s technology came to the rescue. Attendees could rent a pair of earphones and a receiver that allowed them to listen to an English interpretation of all the French dialogue spoken on stage.

Takahashi’s panel was the last one of the day, scheduled for 6:00 p.m. Sadly, it started very late and the auditorium, which could seat 400 people, was only about a quarter full. Nevertheless, the true fans in the room were all very enthusiastic. They made sure Takahashi could hear their cheers when he arrived on stage, even as the French Yu-Gi-Oh! theme song thundered from the loudspeakers as he entered.

Takahashi was accompanied on stage by his interpreter, Sahé Cibot, the general manager of Shibuya International and one of the manga contest’s judges. They were joined by Naoki Kawashima, deputy editor in chief of Shueisha’s Weekly Shonen Jump and fellow manga contest judge, although Kawashima did not speak during the panel. The moderator was Matthieu Pinon, a journalist and author who specializes in manga and anime topics.

This post contains a full transcript of Kazuki Takahashi’s Q&A panel.

Matthieu Pinon, Sahé Cibot, Kazuki Takahashi, and Naoki Kawashima at Takahashi's Q&A panel at MAGIC 2019
Left to right: Matthieu Pinon, Sahé Cibot, Kazuki Takahashi, and Naoki Kawashima

Matthieu Pinon: Good evening, everyone. Thank you for waiting for this grand moment, this extraordinary meeting with Mr. Takahashi, the author of the manga Yu-Gi-Oh!, whom you all know because you are all passionate about manga and Japanese pop culture. To begin this conference, we will first ask Mr. Takahashi, what manga did you read when you were a child? What manga did you like to read?

Kazuki Takakashi: Honestly, I liked to watch Japanese tokusatsu [special effects] TV shows where kaiju appear, like the Ultraman series and Kamen Rider. These are what led me to want to draw.

Pinon: So drawing is all well and good as a hobby, but at some point you decided to become a professional. What motivated you to move in this direction?

Takahashi: Since I loved to draw, I wanted to make it my career. Before I was a manga author, I was an illustrator and also worked on video games. Then I started developing manga.

Pinon: You just talked about video games. At the time Yu-Gi-Oh! launched, video games had exploded in popularity in Japan. Then you came along with Yu-Gi-Oh!, which was a table-top game, something that might seem a bit old-fashioned compared to the current trend. Was your editor surprised when you presented this project?

Takahashi: No, not at all. Back when I was working at a game company, it was an era of martial arts video games where players could take control of characters and make them fight. So, it was less interesting to create a manga about martial arts. It was more special, more different to make a manga about table-top games, which are analog and more traditional.

Pinon: There are many table-top games in the world. And when Yu-Gi-Oh! first debuted, the manga included several categories of games. When you launched the card game, that’s when the manga became a success. This success is thanks to you [the audience] and the editors. How did public interest in the Yu-Gi-Oh! card game manifest itself?

Takahashi: When the manga began, the original concept was to show various ways of battling using games each week. At first, I wasn’t even thinking about a card game. Cards were just one of those games. After drawing them for two weeks, there was such an overwhelming reaction from the readers that I decided to make the manga into a series about cards as a response to their request.

Kazuki Takahashi speaking at his Q&A panel at MAGIC 2019, with Sahé Cibot and Naoki Kawashima

Pinon: To first explain how readers can express their interest, we have to remember that the magazines contain a small postcard in that back that readers can mail to the publication to specify which series they prefer. And it was right at the moment that the card games appeared in Yu-Gi-Oh! that the manga climbed further and further into the top 10. Speaking of cards, you didn’t just make these cards by happenchance; you actually developed rules for the game. Could you explain to us your process of creating a card? How did you determine its characteristics while taking into account the increase in the number of cards as the game progresses?

Takahashi: First, I created the story and decided how a character would play an active role in that story. Then I asked myself, what card would be the most dramatic when used by the protagonist while fighting against an opponent? Are fan-favorite characters playing an active role? From there I created each card.

Pinon: Could you tell us, briefly, how many cards you created for the game? Do you remember?

Takahashi: I’ve… Never counted before. Quite a lot, I guess. Like… A thousand.

Pinon: Around a thousand! I think that deserves a round of applause because a thousand cards is so–

[The audience applauds, drowning out Pinon.]

Pinon: And among these one thousand cards, the most famous is the Blue-Eyes White Dragon. But why a white dragon with blue eyes? Why not, say, a black phoenix with red eyes? Why did you choose this animal with this color and specifically this eye color?

Takahashi: I wanted to design a mystical and cool monster for Yugi’s first rival, Seto Kaiba, when he appeared for their first battle. That monster became the Blue-Eyes White Dragon. In a black-and-white world [of manga], I wanted its name to evoke a feeling that would allow readers to conjure up its colors. Ultimately, the Blue-Eyes White Dragon turns out to be a woman — a woman with white hair, white skin, and blue eyes who is revealed in the story to be a spirit.

Pinon: Does anyone out there have the Blue-Eyes White Dragon card?

[Many people in the audience raise their hands.]

Takahashi: Ah. [Nods.]

Pinon: Congratulations, you can show off to others.

[The audience laughs.]

Pinon: And when you watch Game of Thrones, you will get to see your card.[1]

[A few more chuckles from the audience.]

Pinon: Quite often, a duel in Yu-Gi-Oh! is more than a simple face-to-face confrontation between two players. Through the strategy of the opponents, players get to know one another better. It’s almost as if they are communicating through the cards. Was this important to you in your manga?

Takahashi: Yes, that’s right. Because the protagonist, Yugi, is a character that readers are rooting for, I always thought about how to give him a dramatic victory. For example, his trump card gets destroyed and he needs a come-from-behind win. I always thought about how to make such dramatic developments possible in narrative terms.

Kazuki Takahashi speaking at his Q&A panel at MAGIC 2019, with Matthieu Pinon and Sahé Cibot

Pinon: As we all see, MAGIC invites not only famous manga authors but also authors of [non-Japanese] comics. We know that you are a particular fan of this medium. What comic series do you read? Which do you follow with great interest?

Takahashi: I really like Mike Mignola. When it comes to BD, I really like Moebius.[2]

Pinon: Those of you who have been to Japan before might know that production of Japan’s own homegrown comics is quite important, so much so that foreign comics, whether French or American, are not well represented. Where did you find them, and how did you enter the world of comics?

Takahashi: There actually are places in Japan that sell American comics and I occasionally visit them to shop. I’ve always been a fan of American comics, especially stories about superheroes. I love the impactfulness of the artwork, a style that can’t be found in Japanese manga.

Pinon: You mentioned Mike Mignola. You had the opportunity to meet him and exchange drawings. He drew Yugi and you drew Hellboy. Could you tell us a little about this meeting? Because, when we see the drawings, it must have been quite the interesting encounter.[3]

Takahashi: I actually haven’t met him. I was excited to meet him at a comic convention but it didn’t work out. But we did end up collaborating. I drew Mike Mignola’s Hellboy while he drew Yugi.

Pinon: [You exchanged your drawings] through your publishers?

Sahé Cibot: Right.[4]

Pinon: For those of you who don’t know how Yu-Gi-Oh! ends, we aren’t going to spoil it for you, but you really should read the manga to the end because it’s quite exciting. The conclusion of Yu-Gi-Oh! is particularly successful. There are many manga that will simply stop, with publishers stating that their popularity is declining and that this is where they would draw the line. But you took great care to make a well-prepared ending. How did you plan this with your editor? Without revealing the ending to the reader, could you tell us how you prepared this well-developed, thoughtful ending?

Takahashi: When serialization of Yu-Gi-Oh! began, I had already decided that Yugi would meet the other Yugi — that he would meet his, umm, double — and that the two would fight in the end. I decided from the very beginning that Yugi would win.

[Cibot translates Takahashi’s answer into French, but leaves out his last statement that Yugi would win.]

Cibot: This is a huge spoiler, isn’t it?

[The audience laughs.]

Pinon: The ending is from 2004 so those who got spoiled are 15 years behind. We won’t blame you.

Cibot: Well, I didn’t say who won.

Pinon: This is so– Anyway.[5] Why was it important to you that he meet his double?

Takahashi: Well, it’s kind of like a multiple personality. The idea is that when the protagonist finds himself in trouble, a stronger version of himself appears. As the story progresses, he learns more about that other self and realizes that he must defeat him in order to become independent. Eventually, he does defeat his other self, grow, and become independent. This is the theme of the story.

Pinon: Sometimes, our greatest adversary is none other than ourselves. Two years ago, I believe, Yu-Gi-Oh! was developed into a smartphone mobile app. There was a monstrous promotional campaign in Tokyo where you could see billboards all over the Yamanote [railway line], the likes of which is completely unimaginable over here.[6] How did it make you feel seeing the analog game that you had designed shift into a video game?

Takahashi: Sure enough, in the manga, there was a rule that the game should absolutely not be taken in a digital direction. But we’re talking about Konami Digital Entertainment here, so…

[Takahashi and Naoki Kawashima laugh.]

Kazuki Takahashi glancing to his left and laughing at his Q&A panel at MAGIC 2019

Pinon: Time has moved on of course and video games are now available on smartphones that everyone can have in their hands. So time passed and in 2004, you stopped the manga. And for ten years, you supervised everything that was developed after that. Then, in 2013, you returned with a one-shot called DRUMP. What motivated you to create this manga?

Takahashi: I had the opportunity to do a one-shot. I thought of making the theme about card games. The Yu-Gi-Oh! card game is incredibly extensible, with rare cards and powerful cards constantly being introduced–

Pinon: It’s quite the catalog. I think some people have one or more binders that are stuffed full of cards.

Takahashi: On the other hand, I thought I could make an interesting game using playing cards, which are limited to 52 cards, so I created a manga based on that concept.[7]

Pinon: So in DRUMP, if you have a deck of 52 cards and a pencil, you can build and rebuild a [DRUMP] deck. You will only ever need 52 cards. Did this constraint help you create a crazy new concept? Or was it a barrier?

Takahashi: I did a lot of play-testing and found it to be a well-rounded game, so I created a story around it. I had fun drawing it and making the cards. It was interesting to play. I really wanted it to become popular, but compared to the power of Yu-Gi-Oh!, it paled in comparison. [Laughs.]

Pinon: As you may have noticed, we’re running a bit late so we’re going to have to cut this short. However, to finish, Mr. Takahashi, you don’t often have the opportunity to meet a Monacan or French audience. Perhaps you have something you would like to tell your fans, who have come and waited until the end of the day to see you. So if you have anything you would like to say, now is the time. Seize the moment.

Takahashi: More than 20 years have passed since Yu-Gi-Oh! began serialization. I am so grateful to be able to come to Monaco to interact with fans. I thank you all from the bottom of my heart for supporting Yu-Gi-Oh!.

Sahé Cibot and Kazuki Takahashi looking at the audience at MAGIC 2019 at Takahashi's Q&A panel

Interview Notes

1. ^ See Game of Thrones, season 7, episode 7.

2. ^ BD (bédé) is short for bande dessinée, a term describing comics of French or Belgian origin. Jean “Moebius” Giraud was a famous creator of BD.

3. ^ Takahashi’s and Mike Mignola’s illustrations were printed in VIZ Media’s September 2004 issue of Shonen Jump magazine.

Kazuki Takahashi's Hellboy artwork and Mike Mignola's Yugi artwork from VIZ Media's Shonen Jump, September 2004

As described in this issue, VIZ Media had asked Takahashi to draw his favorite American comic book character with Yu-Gi-Oh!-style hair, so he created the Hellboy drawing on the left. VIZ then contacted Mignola and he agreed to draw Hellboy clad in Yu-Gi-Oh! apparel. The two artists then exchanged these drawings.

4. ^ In this awkward exchange, the interpreter, Cibot, did not translate into Japanese the first part of Pinon’s statement about how Takahashi had exchanged drawings with Mignola. Instead, she asked if Takahashi had ever met Mignola before. That’s why Takahashi repeated the same information in his response.

5. ^ Another awkward exchange. Nothing was lost in translation here though. Takahashi ignored the no-spoiler request, hahaha.

6. ^ The mobile app that Pinon mentions is of course Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links. The Yamanote Line is a circular railway loop that connects Tokyo’s major city centers. The Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links billboards described by Pinon appeared in March 2017 and were well documented on social media and in Konami’s own video ads.

7. ^ The game Takahashi created is called DRUMP and uses a standard deck of 52 playing cards. The manga, also called DRUMP, was published in 2013 in Shueisha’s 49th issue of Weekly Shonen Jump magazine. It was not published in English or French.

(Questions and answers have been edited for clarity and readability.)

* * *

Next:
Kazuki Takahashi at MAGIC 2019, Part 4: Live Drawing

Previously:
Kazuki Takahashi at MAGIC 2019, Part 2: Autographs

Jump Force Teaser Reveals Seto Kaiba’s Fighting Abilities

March 29, 2019 at 10:00 pm | Posted in Duel Monsters, Yu-Gi-Oh! | 2 Comments
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Close-up of Seto Kaiba in Jump Force

Seto Kaiba is absolutely wrecking Yugi in the newest Jump Force teaser, out today from publisher Bandai Namco. Kaiba is shown unleashing energy attacks using Blue-Eyes White Dragon, then summoning Obelisk the Tormentor to punch out a defenseless Yugi. He also has the Crush Card Virus at his disposal, along with another attack that uses chains — possibly Shadow Spell.

Look for Kaiba to arrive in Jump force some time this May as part of the Characters Pass, which retails for $29.99.

Previously:
Seto Kaiba Joins Jump Force as DLC Character

Yu-Gi-Oh! Legacy of the Duelist: Link Evolution Coming Summer 2019 to Nintendo Switch

March 21, 2019 at 2:00 pm | Posted in Konami, Yu-Gi-Oh! | Leave a comment
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Yu-Gi-Oh! Legacy of the Duelist: Link Evolution logo

Yu-Gi-Oh! is getting a brand-new video game exclusively for the Nintendo Switch this summer! Today, Konami unveiled the English version of Yu-Gi-Oh! Legacy of the Duelist: Link Evolution, which includes over 9,000 cards and the use of the latest rules featuring Link monsters. The game allows players to relive the stories from the Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters, GX, 5D’s, ZEXAL, and ARC-V eras, as well as the newest VRAINS series. Players can also challenge other duelists with local-play or Nintendo Switch Online. All of the content in the original Legacy of the Duelist game is included too.

Konami states on Legacy of the Duelist’s Japanese website that it will debut in Japan slightly earlier, on April 25, 2019. The website also notes that the game will include a total of 145 duelists from the anime series, including new entries like Roman, Don Thousand, and Chojiro.

The original Legacy of the Duelist game launched in July 2015 for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One and expanded in December 2016 to Steam with additional content.

Yugi challenging Kaiba in the Yu-Gi-Oh! Legacy of the Duelist: Link Evolution story mode

Yuya meeting Sylvio in the Yu-Gi-Oh! Legacy of the Duelist: Link Evolution story mode

Playmaker playing Link Spider against a Knight of Hanoi in Yu-Gi-Oh! Legacy of the Duelist: Link Evolution

Dark Magician getting summoned in Yu-Gi-Oh! Legacy of the Duelist: Link Evolution

Seto Kaiba Joins Jump Force as DLC Character

March 16, 2019 at 6:00 am | Posted in Duel Monsters, Yu-Gi-Oh! | Leave a comment
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Promotional screenshot of Jump Force showing Seto Kaiba

Jump Force is getting its very first DLC character and it is the one and only Seto Kaiba! Yugi’s eternal rival arrives sporting his shiny white Battle City jacket and will be included in the Jump Force Characters Pass, which retails for $29.99 and includes nine new playable characters. The official Japanese Yu-Gi-Oh! news hub YU-GI-OH.jp reports that Kenjiro Tsuda will reprise his role as Kaiba’s voice actor.

Bandai Namco Entertainment has provided a road map of updates for April through August. Look for Kaiba and two other unnamed fighters to join Jump Force’s roster some time in May.

Which monsters do you think Kaiba will use? Blue-Eyes White Dragon and Obelisk the Tormentor for sure, right? What kind of banter do you think Kaiba will have with the other characters?

Previously:
Jump Force Trailer Reveals Yugi’s Fighting Abilities, Battle Ship

Jump Force Trailer Reveals Yugi’s Fighting Abilities, Battle Ship

October 5, 2018 at 6:00 pm | Posted in Duel Monsters, Yu-Gi-Oh! | Leave a comment
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Yugi commanding Dark Magician and Dark Magician Girl to attack in Jump Force

When Bandai Namco Entertainment announced that Yugi would be fighting using his monsters in the upcoming Jump Force video game, they weren’t kidding. A new trailer posted by the publisher reveals Dark Magician and Dark Magician Girl using energy-based attacks and holding their own against Toguro from Yu Yu Hakusho, Freeza from Dragon Ball, and Sosuke Aizen from Bleach. Yugi is also shown dramatically summoning Slifer the Sky Dragon from a card. Yugi himself doesn’t appear to do any physical fighting.

The trailer also provides a potential clue about the story in Jump Force. Yugi is fighting in the newly revealed Golden Gate Bridge stage, the locale of a chaotic scene. Vehicles are piled up and overturned on and around the bridge. Statues from the Naruto universe’s Valley of the End have altered the landscape of the iconic bridge, while a flag featuring the symbol of the Village Hidden in the Leaves is shown fluttering. Could the universes of Shonen Jump be melding with our real world?

What would our world be like if the Yu-Gi-Oh! universe invades? We may already have an answer. Several shots from the trailer reveal Kaiba’s Battle Ship (called Kaiba Kraft 3 in 4Kids’ English anime) flying in the background. Is that just for effect? Or could it be another stage or part of the story?

If you are at New York Comic Con this weekend, check out the Bandai Namco booth (#515) where you can play a demo of Jump Force. Alas, Yugi is not one of the playable characters in this demo, but you can still have fun with Goku, Luffy, and several other iconic characters.

Previously:
Yugi Confirmed Playable in Jump Force Video Game, Fights Using Monsters

Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D’s Comes to Duel Links

September 25, 2018 at 12:00 pm | Posted in 5D's, English dubbed, Japanese, Yu-Gi-Oh! | Leave a comment
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Crimson Dragon mark and eye from the Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D's Duel World opening animation in Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links

Duelists young and old, professional and amateur alike, it’s the moment you’ve been waiting for! The world of Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D’s is here! Yusei Fudo and his friends today join the smash hit Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links game. With them come the new Synchro monsters and Synchro summoning mechanic.

Synchro what?! Don’t worry, they’re not complicated. But if you don’t know how to Synchro summon, you’ll be able to play a short tutorial after picking up your first Synchro cards that teaches you how to use them.

To gain access to the 5D’s Duel World, you first need to unlock Yusei by reaching Stage 10 in the DM Duel World. Then, complete the Character Unlock Mission of summoning Wind-attribute monsters ten times. As you reach higher stages, you’ll be able to unlock more characters, like Akiza Izinski, Leo, and more.

In Japan, the Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D’s anime will begin streaming on several Japanese video networks beginning on October 1 to celebrate this update. Fans in the West are more fortunate, as we’ve had the entire Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D’s anime, both dubbed and subbed, streaming for free for the last couple of years.

Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links’ addition of the 5D’s world follows its release of the GX world almost exactly one year ago.

Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D's logo and Duel World (5D's) in Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links

Yusei Fudo, Jack Atlas, and Stardust Dragon in Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links

Yugi Confirmed Playable in Jump Force Video Game, Fights Using Monsters

September 19, 2018 at 7:00 am | Posted in Duel Monsters, Yu-Gi-Oh! | Leave a comment
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Jump Force Yu-Gi-Oh! promo image featuring Yami Yugi with Slifer the Sky Dragon, Dark Magician, and Dark Magician Girl

Bandai Namco Entertainment today revealed additional information about Yugi’s appearance in its upcoming Jump Force video game. The publisher confirmed that Yugi is a playable character in the game and pictured him armed with his Duel Disk and deck. Bandai Namco further stated that Yugi fights using Spell cards and Monster cards, including Dark Magician, Dark Magician Girl, and Slifer the Sky Dragon.

Jump Force debuts on Playstation 4, Xbox One, and Steam in 2019. It is available for pre-order right now.

Previously:
Yugi Joins Jump Force Video Game

Yugi Joins Jump Force Video Game

September 14, 2018 at 7:00 am | Posted in Duel Monsters, Yu-Gi-Oh! | 2 Comments
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Promotional screenshot of Jump Force showing Yami Yugi

Yugi has entered the fray! The protagonist of Yu-Gi-Oh! has joined Jump Force, an upcoming tag-team fighting game featuring characters from Shueisha’s Weekly Shonen Jump magazine. Publisher Bandai Namco Entertainment and the official Japanese Yu-Gi-Oh! news website YU-GI-OH.jp made the big announcement today, revealing the in-game screenshot of Yami Yugi seen above.

YU-GI-OH.jp states that Yugi Muto (and not Yami Yugi) is the character who appears in the game and is voiced by Shunsuke Kazama.

Playable characters in Jump Force revealed thus far include Bleach’s Ichigo, Rukia, and Aizen; Dragon Ball’s Goku, Vegeta, and Freeza; Hunter x Hunter’s Gon and Killua; Naruto’s Naruto and Sasuke; and One Piece’s Luffy, Zolo, Sanji, Sabo, and Blackbeard. There’s no word yet whether Yugi will be a playable character, or will only appear as part of the story like Death Note’s Light Yagami and Ryuk.

Jump Force was developed to celebrate Weekly Shonen Jump’s 50th anniversary and will debut in 2019 on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Steam.

(News from @BandaiNamcoEU, YU-GI-OH.jp)

Update (September 19): Bandai Namco has revealed that Yugi is a playable character and battles using Monster and Spell cards!

Get Yugi Hair Anytime with Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links’ Facebook Camera Effect

February 5, 2018 at 9:00 am | Posted in Duel Monsters, Other Stuff, Yu-Gi-Oh! | Leave a comment
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Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Link's Yugi hair camera effect in action

Instant Yami Yugi hair and perfect bottom eyeliner are now possible thanks to a new Facebook camera effect from Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links. In addition to transforming you into the King of Games, the effect can also add an attacking Dark Magician by your side. Give it a try!

(News from @YuGiOh_DL_INFO)

Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links PC Steam Version Coming November 17

November 15, 2017 at 6:00 pm | Posted in Konami, Yu-Gi-Oh! | 2 Comments
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Blue-Eyes White Dragon summoned in Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links, PC Steam version

Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links is coming to the PC! Konami announced today that the popular mobile game will arrive on Steam this Friday, November 17. Whether duelists decide play on mobile or the PC, all their progress is retained between the two platforms.

Sample screenshots of the Steam version show that the game takes full advantage of the larger screen real estate by offering a three-column display. In the overworld, the global chat appears in the right column. And during a duel, card details are listed in the left column while a log of the duel is shown in the right.

Download for free at: http://store.steampowered.com/app/601510/YuGiOh_Duel_Links/

Select Mode screen in Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links, PC Steam version

Duel World overworld screen in Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links, PC Steam version

Deck editing mode in Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links, PC Steam version

Screenshot of a duel in Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Links, PC Steam version

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