Inside the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC, Part 3

October 10, 2019 at 9:00 pm | Posted in Konami, Yu-Gi-Oh! | 2 Comments
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Entrance to the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

The Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC was held in Manhattan’s Chelsea art district, home to over 200 galleries. Because of its prominent location, the exhibition attracted not only Yu-Gi-Oh! fans but also art enthusiasts who knew nothing about the franchise.

All signs point to Yu-Gi-Oh! — or at least the spray-painted signs did. On the streets surrounding the gallery and leading from New York Comic Con at the Javits Center, wayfarers could find advertisements for the art show on the pavements.

Two different spray-painted sign advertising the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC on the pavement

The gallery, with its brightly lit white walls and polished dark oak floors, offered an air of elegance and sophistication to the exhibition, a feeling that one might not normally associate with Yu-Gi-Oh!.

With over 60 works on display, the show had something for everyone to enjoy.

Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC logo on the wall inside the gallery

Duel Time by Pretty in Plastic at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

Duel Time sculpture and a group of duelists in the background at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

Visitors looking at art and walking around the gallery at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

More visitors checking out the gallery at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

Yu-Gi-Oh! Nesting Dolls and other works at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

Visitors looking at art around the display cases at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

Obliterate and Ruby on display at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

Cathy Catherine and Friends, Pharaoh Atem, and Yami Yugi on display at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

Fluffal Mouse and other works in the background at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

Visitors around Scary Yugi and other works at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

At the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC, fans and art connoisseurs with deep pockets could purchase any of the original pieces on display. (Well, almost any — not Kazuki Takahashi’s works.)

By the end of the first day, two pieces had already been sold. Can you guess what those first two pieces were?

Maybe one of the three-dimensional creations?

Like Duel Time, the plastic resin and wood sculpture made by Pretty in Plastic that greets all gallery visitors. (Price: $18,000.)

Close-up of the Duel Time sculpture at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

Or Brad Albright’s wood and giclee print sculpture Millennium Puzzle, shown below right. (Price: $600.) This would look right at home in a game shop or any gaming-themed room.

Performapal Changeraffe and Millennium Puzzle on display at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

Or Blue-Eyes Toon Dragon, a customized 8-inch Kidrobot Munny figure by Jared Flores. (Price: $1,000.)

Close-up of Blue-Eyes Toon Dragon figure on display at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

All of these three-dimensional works would be awesome to own.

But maybe the buyers preferred a two-dimensional piece.

How about an artsy take on an iconic character and monster, like Mark Borgion’s giclee print Summon the Sky Dragon? (Price: $600.)

Summon the Sky Dragon on display at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

Or this large-scale canvas print of Chet Phillip’s Spellcaster? (No price given.) Brand new for this NYC show, it’s bigger than the screen printed version, and classier too, if you ask me.

Spellcaster large-scale canvas print on display at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

I bet contemporary art connoisseurs who frequent the Chelsea gallery district would be thrilled to own I’m In Love… With Dueling! by Dan Litzinger, pictured below center. (Price: $1,200.) This 36-by-48 inch acrylic-on-aluminum work takes its cues from Roy Lichtenstein and his famous Drowning Girl.

I'm In Love... With Dueling! and other works on display at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

But no, none of these were among the first two pieces to sell. That honor goes to Tiki of Greed and Hitotsu-Me Giant.

Tiki of Greed, pictured below center, comes from Carrie Ann Hudson, an illustrator and painter from San Diego, California. It is a work of ink and felt tip on paper and was priced at $600.

ABAKI, Tiki of Greed, and Hummingbird on display at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

Tiki of Greed on display at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

Hitotsu-Me Giant, pictured below right, originated from the mind of Steve Dressler, a native New Yorker and a graduate of Parsons School of Design in Manhattan. It was first offered as a limited edition screen print at the Los Angeles art show.

King of Games, The Millennium Puzzle, and Hitotsu-Me Giant on display at the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC

The story behind the sale of Hitotsu-Me Giant is especially entertaining.

As described to me by someone who shan’t be named: On the evening of the first day of the exhibition, a drunk art critic and their friends found their way to the Yu-Gi-Oh! art show. The critic, who knew absolutely nothing about Yu-Gi-Oh!, took one look at Hitotsu-Me Giant and decided that they simply must have it. They were prepared to plop down a thousand or more dollars for original framed screen print, number 1/100. But fortunately for their wallet, the price was only $400. The critic’s friends, joining in on the excitement, all took home limited edition screen prints of Hitotsu-Me Giant for a comparatively cheap $50.

Congratulations to the buyers, whoever you are. Enjoy your piece of Yu-Gi-Oh! history!

More photos to come…

* * *

Next:
Inside the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC, Part 4

Previously:
Inside the Yu-Gi-Oh! Tribute Art Show NYC, Part 2

2 Comments »

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  1. Haha that story about the Hitotsu-Me Giant art is hilarious! It certainly is a very unique artistic style.

  2. Of all the limited edition screen prints, it certainly is the most different. I’m happy someone appreciates it for its aesthetic value.


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