Inside Gallery1988’s Yu-Gi-Oh! Art Show, Part 1

July 12, 2019 at 7:00 pm | Posted in Konami, Yu-Gi-Oh! | 2 Comments
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Front of Gallery1988 in Los Angeles, California

Have you visited Gallery1988 and Konami Cross Media NY’s Yu-Gi-Oh! tribute art show? The exhibition, which includes over 50 original pieces inspired by the franchise created by Kazuki Takahashi, celebrates the 20th anniversary of the global Yu-Gi-Oh! phenomenon. As the show enters its final weekend, let’s take a look at the exhibits and some of the excitement that took place at the pop culture art gallery in Los Angeles.

Obliterate by Caitlin Peters at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show
Obliterate by Caitlin Peters
Gouache on wood panel
12 x 12 inches

The Yu-Gi-Oh! art show kicked off with an invite-only reception the evening of July 4 for some of the most important people in the Yu-Gi-Oh! business. Representatives from Konami Digital Entertainment, Shueisha, d-rights, TV Tokyo, VIZ Media, Crunchyroll, Funimation, and other Yu-Gi-Oh! industry partners arrived to enjoy a sneak peek of the exhibition and partake in the open bar.

One person who was notably absent from the opening reception was Yu-Gi-Oh! creator Kazuki Takahashi. In his stead, Yoshihisa Heishi, the founding editor of Yu-Gi-Oh! and a director at Shueisha, was present.

D-Runner by Laz Marquez at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show
D-Runner by Laz Marquez
Giclee print
18 x 24 inches

Close-up of Yusei in D-Runner by Laz Marquez at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show

The following evening, July 5, Gallery1988 opened its doors to the public. Over 75 people lined up to be among the first to see the historic exhibition. The small art gallery, which is only about as wide as a single-aisle passenger plane, was packed full.

Today, Konami posted a Facebook album showing many of the enthusiastic visitors on the opening night.

Blue-Eyes White Dragon paper collage by Meghan Stratman at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show
Blue-Eyes White Dragon by Meghan Stratman
Paper collage
8 x 8 inches, 14 x 14 inches framed

Close-up of the Blue-Eyes White Dragon paper collage by Meghan Stratman at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show

Low-angle shot of the Blue-Eyes White Dragon paper collage by Meghan Stratman at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show

Many visitors picked up one or more of the show’s six limited edition screen prints. The gallery kindly bagged and boarded each 18-by-24-inch print for free to protect the precious artwork. But the prints were such strong sellers that the gallery quickly ran out of backing boards. Whoops!

Spellcaster by Chet Phillips at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show
Spellcaster by Chet Phillips
Giclee print
13 x 19 inches
Signed and numbered edition 1/1

Close-up of Spellcaster by Chet Phillips at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show

A screen print is considered a unique piece of art. Each of the Yu-Gi-Oh! prints was made by a shop in Seattle, Washington, and individually numbered, with only 100 of each design created. At just $50 each, the prints are a steal. Once they sell out, they are gone forever!

Cathy Catherine and Friends by Erin Gallagher at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show
Cathy Catherine and Friends by Erin Gallagher
Giclee print
13 x 19 inches
Signed, limited edition of 1

In addition to the six different screen prints, Gallery1988 also offered the Yu-Gi-Oh! art show’s commemorative poster for sale. This piece by Joshua Budich measures 16-by-20 inches and costs $10.

Top view of Bronk needlefelt by Ed Mironiuk at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show
Bronk by Ed Mironiuk
Merino needlefelt
13 x 6 x 6 inches

Front view of Bronk needlefelt by Ed Mironiuk at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show

Rear view of Bronk needlefelt by Ed Mironiuk at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show

Yu-Gi-Oh! fans who want to buy prints but who can’t make it to the show might still have a chance to get them.

“There will be some variants and other formats available online after the show ends,” Konami said on Facebook.

Gallery1988’s Twitter account, @Galleries1988, has also stated more than once that remaining prints will be sold online after the show closes on July 14.

ABAKI by DonutGlow at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show
ABAKI by DonutGlow
Digital print
8 x 8 inches
Limited edition of 1

Still, there’s no guarantee that the prints won’t sell out before then, so if you can, do make every effort to attend this once-in-a-lifetime event.

Yami Yugi by Scott Balmer at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show
Yami Yugi by Scott Balmer
Print on wood
7 x 16 inches
Limited edition of 1

Close-up of Yami Yugi by Scott Balmer at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show

Aside from that, the Yu-Gi-Oh! art show is definitely an event you want to see in person. There’s no way that looking at any number of photographs of the exhibits will ever replicate the experience of seeing them in person.

Millennium Puzzle by Brad Albright at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show
Millennium Puzzle by Brad Albright
3D wood and giclee print sculpture
10.5 x 13.25 x 2 inches

Side view of Millennium Puzzle by Brad Albright at the Gallery1988 Yu-Gi-Oh! art show

The Yu-Gi-Oh! art show runs through July 14 at Gallery1988 in Los Angeles.

More photos to come…

* * *

Next:
Inside Gallery1988’s Yu-Gi-Oh! Art Show, Part 2

2 Comments »

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  1. Ooh, I was wondering if you were going to cover this! I was able to drop by on July 5th, since I was in the area for Anime Expo — I’m actually in one of the photos that Konami posted haha. It was such a cool event!

    I didn’t know that they were selling the commemorative poster as well, but I did enough damage to my wallet from buying some of the prints that that’s probably for the better. xD

    Which piece was your favorite? (If you can pick.) I liked a lot of the ones you shared in this post.

  2. Hooray for getting to see the show! (And for becoming secretly famous after getting photographed by Konami lol.)

    It’s really hard to choose a favorite. There are so many good ones that I like for various reasons. In this post, I really like the Blue-Eyes paper collage. Out of the ones I haven’t posted yet, I like the Kiwi Magician Girl piece where her face is like O_O and there are ghosts and monsters popping out the ground. I also like the retrowave Blue-Eyes piece.


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