Yu-Gi-Oh! Bonds Beyond Time to Get U.S. DVD, Blu-ray on July 15 from Cinedigm

March 14, 2014 at 9:25 pm | Posted in Bonds Beyond Time, English dubbed, Japanese, Konami, Yu-Gi-Oh! | 15 Comments
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Yu-Gi-Oh! Bonds Beyond Time Blu-ray cover mock-up from Cinedigm

Today, 4K Media (Konami) formally announced that Yu-Gi-Oh! Bonds Beyond Time will be released on DVD and Blu-ray in the U.S.! The long-awaited home video release will include both the English-dubbed and original Japanese-subbed versions of the memorable 10th anniversary movie, as well as the 10-minute introductory flashback exclusive to the English version. The DVD and BD will be released by Cinedigm on July 15 and will retail for $9.95 and $14.95 respectively.

Up until now, the English-language version of Bonds Beyond Time was only available in the United Kingdom from Manga UK, who released the film on DVD and Blu-ray in mid-2011 in both English and Japanese. The similarities between Manga UK’s products and Cinedigm’s upcoming releases end there, however.

Yu-Gi-Oh! fans who have 3D capable video equipment and who are looking to relive the thrilling theatrical 3D experience that they enjoyed on the big screen will unfortunately not have their needs met with Cinedigm’s BD release. While Manga UK’s BD included both 2D and 3D versions of the film, Cinedigm’s will sadly only include the 2D version.

And while the first press of Manga UK’s DVDs and BDs included a Malefic Red-Eyes B. Dragon promo card for the Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG, Cinedigm’s releases will not.

Make no mistake about it — a U.S. home video release of Bonds Beyond Time is long overdue and it is fantastic to see that 4K Media hasn’t forgotten about it. Nevertheless, it is disappointing that the American release is lacking features that the UK release included. American fans who have already picked up Manga UK’s releases and who value these components might want to think twice before parting with them in favor of Cinedigm’s releases.

Yu-Gi-Oh! Bonds Beyond Time was screened in 300 theaters across the United States on February 26 and 27 and March 5 and 6, 2011 by Cinedigm.

The Long Road to Home Video

Former Yu-Gi-Oh! license holder 4Kids Entertainment originally intended to release Bonds Beyond Time on home video in the U.S. back in July 2011 via A&E Home Video (whose titles were handled by Cinedigm at the time). However, the lawsuit and bankruptcy protection proceedings between 4Kids and the Japanese Yu-Gi-Oh! licensors in early 2011 completely stifled this and other potential licensing deals from coming to pass.

Yu-Gi-Oh! fans in the UK were more fortunate. 4Kids Entertainment International, the overseas licensing arm of 4Kids based in London, was not embroiled in the U.S. lawsuit and was able to secure a distribution deal for the United Kingdom with the UK division of Manga Entertainment. The home video release was originally scheduled for May 30, 2011.

A brief scare caused the release to be pushed back about two months, leaving Manga UK and fans to wonder whether the effects of the lawsuit had rippled across the pond and were impeding the ability of 4Kids’ London-based subsidiary to conduct routine business.

Eventually, 4Kids and Manga UK pulled through, successfully releasing Bonds Beyond Time on DVD and BD on July 25, 2011. The DVD went on to become Manga UK’s second best-selling title of 2011.

Additional reading:
The Home Videos That Never Were: DVD and Blu-ray Releases of Yu-Gi-Oh! 3D: Bonds Beyond Time

15 Comments »

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  1. Well, since I never cared for 3D and I can always order the card off eBay, this still sounds like an awesome release!

  2. I think it’s wonderful that Bonds Beyond Time is finally getting a DVD and Blu-ray release in the US. Also great that it will have both the English and Japanese versions even though I prefer the Japanese version.

  3. @Charles Martin
    It is indeed awesome, and I’m still going to buy them for sure. But the mere fact that some items were included for one English release but not another is awful. It makes it look like the U.S. is getting shafted. What happened to the 3D version of the movie? Is it locked away in a vault, never again to see the light of day? And what about the card? Konami could have capitalized on this opportunity to include it (or a different card) so that the American release mirrors the UK release.
     
    @dbret12
    Thank goodness the Japanese version is included. If it weren’t, I think an Internet riot would have occurred. ;)

  4. I prefer to think the folks at Cinedigm heeded the Bonds Beyond Tine Abridged speech:

    We at Yugioh Abridged like to apologize for the lack of 3D content in this movie, however we like to think this is totally justified since 3D is bullsh*t and adds absolutely nothing to the cinema experience. So please, enjoy your 2D movie. Because it’s cheaper and much less obnoxious.

  5. I feel for the people who wanted the 3D version, but I really only wanted the 2D version, so it doesn’t really affect me.

  6. @Duke
    Hahaha, nice. But in all seriousness, I doubt any of those are the real reasons why the American BD lacks 3D.

  7. Well, no. It was monetary reasons. Cinedigm would have to pay more for a 3D disc (maybe even set up new facilities), which is still a lot more than a regular Blu-ray. Plus, every 3D movie in the US is pretty much required to have a lenticular slipcover, which is an additional cost. And Cinedigm judged that there wouldn’t be enough interest to justify those costs, and can you blame them? Do you think there is enough interest for a 3D version of Yu-Gi-Oh? Most of the older fanbase doesn’t care about 3D. The only kids movies in 3D are either live-action or CG films.

    Plus, a 3D disc would probably double the price of the release at minimum.

  8. Cinedigm is just the distributor and doesn’t make decisions about what content to put out; Konami does. The cost of pressing a BD disc isn’t affected by whether or not it has 3D content. A 3D BD is physically identical to a standard BD. What does matter is the number of discs being produced and whether the BD is single or double layered. I’d agree with you about the cost issue of producing 3D materials if not for the fact that those materials already exist — they were used for Manga UK’s BD, after all — so there’s no need to produce new materials and incur additional expenses.
     
    Just because you haven’t seen a 3D BD without a lenticular cover doesn’t mean that having one is a requirement. What entity could enforce such a silly requirement anyway? The Blu-ray Disc Association? ;)
     
    Whether or not there is interest in a 3D version of Yu-Gi-Oh! and whether or not you think only certain types of kids movies deserve 3D treatment are both irrelevant at this point because, again, the 3D materials already exist. There is no harm in releasing it. So why isn’t it happening?
     
    If it is indeed for monetary reasons, it must be because of something we haven’t considered here. The retail price of Manga UK’s BD is the same as that of Cinedigm’s BD, yet Manga UK’s release has more content.

  9. The 3D materials already exist, but Cinedigm would author their own discs. Konami is the master licensor, but Cinedigm is the one in charge of the actual production of the discs (like Shout Factory or FUNimation). As Cinedigm does not have the capacity to author 3D discs (aa they haven’t done 3D before) they would either need to pay for the equipment or sub-contract it to a company that can, which added to the cost of the extra disc is probably not worth it.

    As for the slipcover, it is mainly for retail stores. Retail companies prefer the lenticular slipcovers so they can have 3D stand out better. It’s also why 3D movies often have special cases that say 3D on it as well (another added cost). Also, not everyone is doing 3D. Only the big studios like Disney and WB are doing 3D movies. Smaller companies like Shout Factory don’t bother. As for the price, this is America. Cinedigm likely has to pay a lot more than Manga UK did for the license, so the price goes up. Speaking of which, Cinedigm would likely have to pay for the 3D version, which they obviously felt wasn’t worth it. Their kids TV sets aren’t exactly lavish.

  10. I keep saying Cinedigm, but I should be saying Flatiron, as they’re the ones encoding the discs.

    In order to use Manga UK’s encoding, they would have to pay Manga UK for that or do their own. And if Manga UK ever loses the license, the next company would have to make their own encode. Just like how Shout Factory is making brand new discs for their Transformers Armada, Energon, and Animated releases despite all three being released previously by Paramount or their unique deal with Lionsgate for Power Rangers Samurai, Super Samurai, and Megaforce.

  11. You included a lot of points in your comments and I’ll try to address them all in order.

    The 3D materials already exist, but Cinedigm would author their own discs…

    Yes, of course Cinedigm authors its own discs, but it sounds like we’re talking about two different things. The raw materials that are used to author the BD containing the 3D content (i.e. the actual data files that make up the CMK/CMF BD disc image) already exist. There is no need to pay for equipment and whatnot to recreate those raw materials. Cinedigm can use those existing materials to author a BD, just as Manga UK used those same materials to author its BD. Authoring and pressing a BD that contains 3D content is done no differently than authoring and pressing a BD without 3D content. All of the work needed to create the 3D content was already completed when the raw materials were created.

    Cinedigm does not have the capacity to author 3D discs…

    If you spend a few seconds on Google, you’ll see that Cinedigm has indeed released BDs with 3D content, like Static and Adventures of the Penguin King. 3D is nothing new to Cinedigm. Don’t forget that prior to buying New Video Group’s home video distribution business, Cinedigm’s raison d’etre was to transform aging movie theaters into digital- and 3D-capable modern venues. On top of that, Cinedigm then utilized those theatrical venues to run 3D programming like movies, sporting events, and concerts.

    As for the slipcover, it is mainly for retail stores. Retail companies prefer the lenticular slipcovers so they can have 3D stand out better. It’s also why 3D movies often have special cases that say 3D on it as well (another added cost).

    What happens to 3D films that are not housed in lenticular slipcovers and special cases?

    Also, not everyone is doing 3D. Only the big studios like Disney and WB are doing 3D movies. Smaller companies like Shout Factory don’t bother.

    I don’t understand how this is relevant. Why does it matter what other companies are and aren’t doing?

    As for the price, this is America. Cinedigm likely has to pay a lot more than Manga UK did for the license, so the price goes up. Speaking of which, Cinedigm would likely have to pay for the 3D version, which they obviously felt wasn’t worth it. Their kids TV sets aren’t exactly lavish.

    The comments that you’ve left here and in some of my other posts made lead me to believe that you are confused about the role that the Yu-Gi-Oh! video distributor plays. Cinedigm does not have a licensing agreement with Konami in the same way that Konami has a licensing agreement with TV Tokyo and ADK. Rather, Cinedigm and Konami have a distribution agreement. The distinction between the two types of agreements is important and was fleshed out in great detail during the Yu-Gi-Oh! lawsuit when explaining the relationship between 4Kids and FUNimation. It’s not worth getting into here, but the gist of this type of relationship is that Konami maintains full video rights to the Yu-Gi-Oh! series, while Cinedigm works only as a third-party contractor to help execute Konami’s video rights.
     
    Cinedigm is not paying Konami for each title in the same manner that Konami is paying the Japanese licensors, which I’m guessing is what you have in mind. Cinedigm’s job is just to manufacture, produce, and distribute the titles that Konami gives it. Because of Cinedigm’s familiarity with the home video supply chain, it may make recommendations to Konami about how to best release a title for it to be successful, but the decision about what specifically to release is in Konami’s hands. The actual video materials, packaging, and extras are all supplied by Konami. So, the lack of a 3D release by Cinedigm is because of Konami’s decision not to provide Cinedigm the 3D materials. It is not because Cinedigm is paying (or not paying) Konami for the rights to the film. Cinedigm does pay Konami a royalty based on how many items are sold though.

    I keep saying Cinedigm, but I should be saying Flatiron, as they’re the ones encoding the discs.

    Flatiron Film Company is just the name of one of Cinedigm’s labels (and prior to that, one of New Video’s). It’s not a separate company, despite the name.

    In order to use Manga UK’s encoding, they would have to pay Manga UK for that or do their own…

    That isn’t what happens. Cinedigm would not use Manga UK’s encoding. Cinedigm would use the same raw materials that Konami sent to Manga UK for Manga UK to create its disc image, but Cinedigm would not use Manga UK’s actual disc image (i.e. Manga UK’s “encoding”).
     
    Don’t be offended when I say this, but I don’t like how you presented a bunch of misinformation in your replies as fact. Other people who might not be familiar with what we are talking about might trust what you are saying without question and take those statements as truths. If you are giving an opinion or are uncertain about something, you should make that clear — qualify your statements with “I think…” or “Maybe…” or “Perhaps…” or “It could be that…” etc. It doesn’t seem like you are out to mislead people intentionally (at least I hope not, hahaha), but that can easily happen with the way you presented your “facts.”

  12. Hey ravegrl, do you think the music for the yugioh dubs will ever be released?

  13. Officially released? Who knows. Anything is possible, I suppose. In the meantime, have you seen Joel Douek’s YouTube channel? Joel is one of the composers whose work has appeared in much of the Yu-Gi-Oh! anime series and movies. He uploaded some music from the original anime that hasn’t been officially released elsewhere. Check it out. I think you’ll like it.

  14. Awesome thanks for that ravegrl! Do you know where I can find any GX or 5Ds music? :)

  15. No idea, sorry. If you can’t find them on YouTube, they’ve probably never been made available.


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